Video : How to Make Print & Cut Hot Foil Stickers (White & Clear)

How to Make Hot Foil Print & Cut Stickers (Clear & White) Video Tutorial

Earlier this year, I shared my technique for making print & cut hot foil acetate embellishments using the Heidi Swapp Minc and a Silhouette Cameo. I was SO happy with the results (and you guys thought the embellishments were pretty neat, too), so the next step was figuring out how to take this technique and apply it to stickers. Yay, stickers!

The most challenging part of this project was finding sticker paper that would work well for foiling. The first sticker paper that I tested was the Avery Glossy Clear Sticker Paper. Unfortunately, when I took a sheet out of the package, I immediately noticed that it had a slight coating on it. I’m sure the coating is to help ink and/or laser toner stick to the page, but it turned out to be a dealbreaker for the hot foil, which needs as smooth and glossy a surface as possible to adhere well. So, this sticker paper may be great for regular inkjet and laser printing, but for hot foiling it’s a no go.

Next, I tried the Full Sheet White Gloss Laser Labels from Online Labels (product number OL177WS) and got fantastic results. These labels are very smooth and glossy, no additional coating, so both the laser toner and the hot foil were able to adhere really well. The results with the white gloss label paper were so great that I placed a second order from Online Labels, this time for the Full Sheet Clear Gloss Laser Labels (product number OL177CL), and I got equally awesome results with the clear labels, which are also very smooth and glossy, no additional coating.

How to Make Hot Foil Print & Cut Stickers (Clear & White) Video Tutorial

Think of all the fun sticker options that we have with this technique. Embellishments for handmade cards and scrapbooking pages, decorative additions to envelopes, and custom planner stickers are just some of the options! This makes the sticker fiend in me very happy.

Cut Settings for the Silhouette Cameo (for all of the sticker papers tested) : Blade Depth = 1 // Speed = 8 // Single Cut

Heat Setting for the Heidi Swapp Minc : 4

Check out the step-by-step video below to see how you can make your own, custom hot foil print & cut stickers:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Whimsy Leaves SVG Digital Stamps + Border Cuts

Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Teal Reactive Foil
Heidi Swapp Minc Gold Reactive Foil
Avery Clear Glossy Clear Sticker Paper (not recommended for hot foiling)
Online Labels Full Sheet White Gloss Laser Labels (OL177WS)
Online Labels Full Sheet Clear Gloss Laser Labels (OL177CL)
a laser printer
plain printer paper
double-sided tape
craft scissors

Tranquility Journaling Cards Freebie : DigiScrap Parade August 2017

The DigiScrap Parade, August 2017

Thanks for participating in the August 2017 DigiScrap Parade! If you’re following the Parade route from start to finish, you should have arrived here from Meagan’s Creations and your next stop will be Studio Flergs. If you get lost along the way, simply head back to the main DigiScrap Parade site to view the master list and get back on track.

My contribution to this month’s DigiScrap Parade is a set of tranquility-themed journaling cards that you can download below. Alternate orientations are included in your download!

DigiScrap Parade, August 2017 : Tranquility Journaling Cards Freebie

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD THE TRANQUILITY JOURNALING CARDS

The Yay List

Sign up for The Yay List and receive exclusive monthly freebies, news, and updates!

A new freebie will be going out on Friday, August 11th.

In addition to the awesome DigiScrap Parade of freebies, the August Pennysaver event is starting today over at The Digital Press. All month long, you can purchase hundreds of products for just $1. Pretty fantastic sale, right? My new Everyday Charm digital elements and papers (see peeks below) are part of this great event, so head on over to my TDP shop and check them out!

k.becca Everyday Charm Digital Scrapbooking Elements & Papers

The Digital Press August 2017 Pennysaver

Video : Silhouette Mint Stamps & Fonts (How Small is Too Small?)

Silhouette Mint Stamps & Fonts : How Small is Too Small? (Video)

How small is too small when it comes to fonts on Silhouette Mint stamps? I’ve been curious about this and, in the video below, I test out three different styles of fonts on stamps made with the Silhouette Mint to see just how small we can get before the fonts become unreadable.

The Results : I tested Arial and Georgia, two common fonts that most of us already have because they come pre-installed with many operating systems. In addition, I tested Adelicia Script, a beautiful and elegant script font with very thin upstrokes.

For Arial, I had pretty clean stamped impressions down to the 8 point size. I may go as small as 7 points, but definitely no smaller than that. The results were similar with Georgia. 8 or 9 point size is the smallest that I’d go with a serif font like this. Any smaller and the serifs (aka, the lines at the ends of the strokes) start to run together a little bit, making the final impression a little on the fuzzy side. I’d recommend using Arial or Georgia (and fonts that are similar in weight and style) on stamps that call for smaller text areas, like custom return address stamps and stamps with personalized name areas.

Unfortunately, my results with Adelicia Script weren’t great. It’s an absolutely beautiful font, but the strokes are just too delicate to work at smaller sizes on Silhouette Mint stamps. I even made a second stamp with this font so I could try out sizes that were a little larger, and I still wasn’t able to get clean stamped impressions. My recommendation for script fonts is to choose a font where the strokes aren’t too light and delicate. If you have a script font that IS on the delicate side and it includes a bold version, try that. Also, if you have a graphic software program (Photoshop, Illustrator, etc.) that allows you to add strokes to text, I’d recommend trying that and saving the text as a PNG file to import into Mint Studio to make your stamp. This way, you have more control over how heavy the lines are.

Check out the video below to see all of my font results:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Arial Font
Georgia Font
Adelicia Script Font
Silhouette Mint Custom Stamp Maker
Silhouette Mint Stamp Kit, X-Large aka 45 x 45
Silhouette Mint Stamp Sheet Set X-Large aka 45 x 45
Silhouette Mint Ink, Black
white cardstock
printer paper

Video : Watercoloring with Crayola Super Tips Markers

Video : Watercoloring with Crayola Super Tips Markers

Can you watercolor with Crayola Super Tips Markers? Yes, you can, and in this week’s video I’ll show you how I made this whimsical floral card using the Crayola markers and one of the bonus printable A2 card front designs that is included in the Whimsy Leaves Digital Stamp set.

I’m really happy with how well the marker colors move when water is added. The result is softer than you’d get with many brands of regular watercolors, but you can always come back in and add layers of color for a bolder, more textured and dimensional look. I was going for a soft, more pastel look in this card, so I kept it to just one layer of color.

I was curious about whether the color would move as well after I left the marker to dry on the paper for several hours and am happy to report that it moved around just as easily when water was added after about 24 hours as it did when I added water immediately after coloring the marker onto the paper. I only tested this with Strathmore Bristol Vellum paper, so just a heads up that you may not get the same results if you use another brand of paper.

The Crayola Super Tips Markers are turning out to be a pretty versatile coloring medium! They may not give you the same results as higher end (read: much more expensive) watercolors or markers, but they’re a great choice if you’re looking for an inexpensive alternative for cardmaking and papercrafting.

Check out the video below to see a step-by-step tutorial for making this fun floral card:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com SBK = Scrapbook.com DKB = Dick Blick SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Whimsy Leaves Digital Stamps + Border Cuts (bonus printable card front)

Crayola 50 Count Washable Super Tips Markers
Strathmore Bristol Vellum Paper ( AMZ // DKB )
a laser printer
a #5 round paintbrush
double-sided tape
paper towels
a cup and water

For the “Hello” Card (shown in video)

All supplies used for this card are the same as for the “Thinking of You” card, but instead of Crayola markers I used Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pens. I outlined all of the elements with the Shadow Mauve and blended them out with a wet paintbrush. Then, I colored the leaves by blending Pale Green, Light Green, and Deep Green (I mixed up which colors I used from element to element) using just the brush pens, no water added.

Zig Clean Color Brush Pens (individual colors used):

045 // Pale Green
041 // Light Green
044 // Deep Green
303 // Shadow Mauve

Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pen Sets

Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pens, Set of 60
Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pens, Set of 48
Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pens, Set of 36
Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pens, Set of 24
Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pens, Set of 12

For the Hot Foil Cards (shown in video)

For these cards, I printed the “Best Wishes” and blank background designs onto Hammermill Color Copy paper, then foiled them using a Minc. The “Best Wishes” card was finished at this point, and I printed, foiled, and cut the “Hello” sentiment from the Whimsy Leaves set and added it to the patterned card front with foam adhesive squares to finish.

Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 6″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Therm O Web Deco Foil, Rose Gold
Therm O Web Deco Foil, Pewter
Hammermill Color Copy Digital Cover 80lb. Paper
3L Foam Adhesive Squares “hello” card only
Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK ) – “hello” card only
a laser printer

Video : DIY Window Clings Silhouette Studio Tutorial

Video : DIY Window Clings Silhouette Studio Tutorial

One of the new materials that Silhouette recently released is Printable Window Cling Material (both clear and white), and I love that this material allows us to create our own, custom window clings for holidays, seasons, and other occasions where you want to add a little bling to the ol’ windows.

I found the Window Cling Material to be easy to work with, and both the printing and cutting went very smoothly. I was a little worried that the ink might not be dry after the page finished printing, but it was completely dry pretty much immediately after printing. I left it for a minute or so before cutting it, though, just in case.

The images that I used are in a pastel color scheme, and they were very light on the clear cling material, but they stood out much better on the white cling material since it’s opaque. So, I recommend going with images that are brighter and/or darker if you’re using the clear cling material. Lots of possibilities with this material, and I’m excited that I can make my own window clings for Halloween, Christmas, or even National Cheeseburger Day if I want to! By the way, National Cheeseburger Day is September 18th this year, just so you know.

Video : DIY Window Clings Silhouette Studio Tutorial

In the video below, I’ll walk you through designing print and cut pages for window clings with either PNG files or SVG files in Silhouette Studio, so you’ll be able to make custom window cling designs whether you have the free (PNG) version or one of the premium versions (PNG or SVG) of Silhouette Studio. This tutorial can be applied to any print and cut designs, so if you want to make stickers, cardstock elements for cardmaking or scrapbooking, or decorations and signage for parties you’ll want to watch this, too.

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com SBK = Scrapbook.com DKB = Dick Blick SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Spring Whimsy Digital Elements + Border Cut Files

Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK )
Silhouette Studio (Free or Designer Edition)
Silhouette Window Cling Material (Clear)
Silhouette Window Cling Material (White)
an inkjet printer

Video : Coloring Die Cuts with Inexpensive Crayola Markers (Super Tips)

Video : Coloring Die Cuts with Inexpensive Crayola Markers (Super Tips)

You don’t need expensive coloring supplies to create fun and super colorful cards and paper craft projects and, in the cardmaking video below, I’ll show you how I used a set of inexpensive Crayola Markers (Super Tips) to color birthday candle die cuts and create a rainbow colored birthday card that really pops!

To add detail to the candles after I colored them, I used a Uniball Signo White Gel Pen, which also adds a touch of texture because the gel ink is a little bit raised on the surface when it dries. I cut the candle flames from the Gold Shine cardstock from My Favorite Things. I love the matte sheen that this cardstock has. They also offer a Gold Foil cardstock that has a mirror-like finish, and I really like that one, too, for adding shiny, golden details to projects.

For the card base, I originally planned on using white cardstock, but when I looked at the card front on the white base, it just didn’t have the contrast that I was looking for in this project. So, I cut a piece of Ripe Raspberry cardstock from My Favorite Things, and I really like the contrast and thin frame that this color adds around the border of the finished card.

Video : Coloring Die Cuts with Inexpensive Crayola Markers (Super Tips)

Check out the video below to see a step-by-step tutorial for making this fun and colorful birthday card:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Hand Lettered Birthday Phrases Digital Stamps

Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK )
Neenah Solar White 80lb. Cardstock
Crayola 50 Count Washable Super Tips Markers
My Favorite Things Gold Shine Cardstock
My Favorite Things Ripe Raspberry Cardstock
Martha Stewart Ball Point Glue Pen
Uni-Ball Signo White Gel Pen
a printer (for the print and cut “happy birthday” background)
a double-sided adhesive runner

Video : Coloring Die Cuts with Inexpensive Crayola Markers (Super Tips)

Video : Distress Ink Stenciled Background with Silhouette Adhesive Stencil Sheets

Cardmaking Video : Distress Ink Stenciled Background with Silhouette Adhesive Stencil Sheets

In last week’s cardmaking video, I put the Silhouette Adhesive Stencil Sheets to the test with watercolor, and they performed beautifully. This week, I tested them out with 80lb. Neenah Solar White cardstock and, while the results weren’t perfect, they weren’t too bad at all. The only issue that I had was that the adhesive on the stencil tore the cardstock in a few small areas as I was removing it.

The stencils and masks made with this material perform so well with Canson XL Watercolor Paper and Strathmore Bristol Smooth paper, the two other papers that I’ve tried with the stencil sheets, and these are both heavier, uncoated papers.  So, a couple of things could’ve been at play with this cardstock. First, it could be that the adhesive on the stencil sheets is just a little too sticky when new for this type of cardstock. Or it could be that the cardstock was too lightweight and/or coated.

One of the tricks that many of us use to de-stick-ify new cutting mats for our die cutting machines is to stick the new mat to an old t-shirt or piece of fabric to remove some of the stickiness from the mat, which helps prevent paper and cardstock from tearing when die cuts are removed from it. I haven’t tried this trick yet with the stencil sheets, but it seems like a good option to make the adhesive on the stencil sheets a little less sticky and help prevent the stencil or mask from sticking to the cardstock as you’re removing it.

So, all in all, I’m still very much digging the Silhouette Adhesive Stencil Sheets. They’re just a little too sticky right out of the package for this particular cardstock.

Cut Settings for the Silhouette Cameo + Adhesive Stencil Material : Blade Depth = 10 // Speed = 4 // Double Cut x 2 (four passes total)

Check out the video below to see how quick and easy it is to create a bold and colorful stenciled background using the Adhesive Stencil Material with Distress Inks:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Large Circles Stencil (I used the 6×6 size for this project)
Love Always SVG Digital Stamps + Border Die Cuts

Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK )
Silhouette Adhesive Stencil Material (8 1/2″ x 11″ sheets)
Neenah Solar White 80lb. Cardstock
Tsukineko Sponge Daubers
Mustard Seed Distress Ink ( AMZ // SSS )
Carved Pumpkin Distress Ink ( AMZ // SSS )
Picked Raspberry Distress Ink Mini ( AMZ // SSS )
Abandoned Coral Distress Ink Mini ( AMZ // SSS )
Seedless Preserves Distress Ink Mini ( AMZ // SSS )
Dusty Concord Distress Ink Mini ( AMZ // SSS )
Post It Tape
3L Foam Adhesive Squares
Minc Rose Gold Reactive Foil*
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″ ( AMZ // SBK )*
baby wipes (for cleanup)

* These supplies were used to make the hot foiled sentiment on the card, which I made before I filmed the video. If you want to learn more about how I make print and cut hot foil elements, check out this video playlist for more info.

Video : Watercolor Masking with Silhouette Adhesive Stencil Sheets

Watercolor Masking with Silhouette Adhesive Stencil Material

For a little while now, I’ve been looking for a material that is water resistant and that can be die cut with a digital die cutting machine and temporarily adhered to cardstock for watercolor masking. I wasn’t having much luck, and then I saw the new adhesive stencil material (8 1/2″ x 11″ sheets) from Silhouette America. It had most of the requirements. Cuttable with a digital die cutting machine? Check. Temporary adhesive? Check. But would it prevent watercolor from bleeding through underneath the area where the stencil mask is adhered? That was my big question, and I’m happy to report that it passed the test with flying colors!

You can see in the photo above just how well the stencil material performed. Those are some clean and crisp lines, I tell ya.

To paint the card, I used loads of water (I did design the project specifically to test the stencil material’s watercolor masking abilities, after all) and my current favorite watercolors from ShinHan. The paint colors that I used are my current favorite combo : Vermilion Hue (412), Peacock Green (429), and Prussian Blue (409). And I added a little bit of black to the Prussian Blue to deepen the color even further. I overlapped the colors slightly as I was painting but not so much that they became muddy, especially in the Vermilian Hue / Peacock Green area., and I added water to the areas where the colors mixed, where needed, to blend out the line between the colors.

To finish the card, I splattered on some white dots using watered down white acrylic paint and a paintbrush.

Cut Settings for the Silhouette Cameo + Adhesive Stencil Material : Blade Depth = 10 // Speed = 4 // Double Cut x 2 (four passes total)

Check out the video below for more details on the Silhouette Adhesive Stencil Material and to see a step-by-step for this card project:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Good Luck Hand Lettered Cut File

Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK )
Silhouette Adhesive Stencil Material (8 1/2″ x 11″ sheets)
Canson XL Watercolor Paper
ShinHan Watercolors
Mijello Silver Nano 40 Palette
#8 round paintbrush (for watercoloring)
#14 round paintbrush (for the acrylic splatters)
Scotch Painter’s Tape
water
paper towels

Video : Ranger Transparent Gloss Texture Paste Thanks Card

Video : Ranger Transparent Gloss Texture Paste Thanks Card

The Ranger Transparent Gloss Texture Paste has been around for a little while, but I only tried it out for the first time recently, and I wish I’d picked some up sooner because it’s a very cool product.

I have to admit that I kind of have an obsession with texture pastes, which probably stems from my obsession with texture, in general. I love that you can customize so many types of texture pastes by adding things like glitter, and in the video below I’ll show you how I made this modern “thanks” card by coloring the texture paste with Distress Inks.

Watch the step-by-step for making the card below:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Hand Lettered Thanks Cut Files

Ranger Transparent Gloss Texture Paste
Strathmore Bristol Smooth Paper ( AMZ // DKB )
Picked Raspberry Distress Ink Mini ( AMZ // SSS )
Candied Apple Distress Ink ( AMZ // SSS )
Carved Pumpkin Distress Ink ( AMZ // SSS )
Mustard Seed Distress Ink ( AMZ // SSS )
Loew Cornell Palette Knife
Ranger Multi Medium Matte Adhesive ( AMZ // SSS )
paper towels
a silicone craft mat or an acrylic stamp block (for mixing the texture paste)

Video : Heidi Swapp Minc White Reactive Foil + Acetate

What You Need to Know About Minc White Foil & Acetate (Video)

I was all “woot, woot!” when the Minc White Reactive Foil was released last year, and I really wanted to be able to show you some examples using the white foil in my video about making die cut foil acetate embellishments. But this particular foil had other ideas, so I had some additional testing to do.

The Minc white reactive foil seems to have somewhat different properties than the other foils. It’s glossy, but it’s not metallic like most of the foil colors in the Minc lineup, and something about the way that the white foil is manufactured causes it to bond with acetate, at least the C-Line laser acetate (the brand that I use), even in places where there’s no toner for it to bond to.

I initially tried using the white foil with acetate on the Minc heat setting 4, which is what I use for the other foils (both Minc and Therm O Web Deco Foil), and you can see my results in the video below. You can also see that there’s not too much difference in the results for heat setting 3. When I turned the Minc to heat setting 1, the lowest heat setting, I did get better results. But the foil still bonded in some areas where there was no toner.

If you’re going for a slightly splatter-y or weathered look, then the results with heat setting 1 are a thumbs up, but if you want results that are as clean as the results that I’ve been getting with acetate and the other foils in both the Minc and Deco Foil lines, then the white foil isn’t going to give you this look. However, as I mention in the video, you may get better results with a different brand of laser printer-friendly acetate or if you have a heat laminator with lower heat setting options than the Minc has.

I also want to mention that the Minc white foil did not have the same issues when I used it to foil matte Dura-Lar (see my video on making die cut foil “vellum” embellishments for more on that), and it also gave very clean results when I used it on watercolor paper with the Minc Reactive Screen Ink on Minc heat setting 5, which is the highest heat setting. So, there’s something unique about the acetate that causes it to bond with the Minc white foil, even in places where it shouldn’t.

Watch the video below for a more detailed look at my results with the Minc white foil:

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Love Always SVG Digital Stamps + Border Die Cuts

Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 6″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Reactive Foil, White
Therm O Web Deco Foil, Rainbow ( AMZ // SBK )
C-Line Transparency Film for Plain Paper/Laser Printers
Grafix Matte .005 Dura-Lar Film – 9″ x 12″
Canson XL Watercolor Paper
Heidi Swapp Minc Liquid Toner Reactive Screen Ink ( AMZ // SBK )
a laser printer
plain printer paper

Video : How to Foil Vellum Paper (What Works & What Doesn’t)

Video : How to Foil "Vellum" Paper (What Works & What Doesn't)

I’ve discovered over the past several weeks that getting clean laser printed results with vellum isn’t as easy as I had hoped it would be. So far, I’ve tried printing on three brands of vellum : Silhouette, Ampad, and Strathmore. To be fair, the Silhouette vellum is geared more toward die cutting and doesn’t mention printing anywhere on its packaging. However, the Ampad brand vellum, which I picked up at a big box store, and the Strathmore vellum, which I purchased from Amazon.com, both state on the packaging that they can be used with laser printers.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to get a clean print with any of the three brands. I tried a number of different paper settings on my printer, including the “transparency” setting, but the toner still lifted and remelted in places where it shouldn’t be on all three brands of vellum. There were still some areas where the printing was pretty clean, even though the overall print was not, so I decided to try and foil a sheet of the Strathmore vellum* to see what the results would be.

After less than stellar results with actual vellum, I remembered that I had some matte Dura-Lar that I use to cut stencils with my digital die cutting machine. Duralar is a polyester film that’s billed as an acetate alternative, and it’s much smoother than any of the brands of vellum that I tested. It’s sort of an acetate / vellum hybrid (at least the matte type is), and I figured that it would be a great candidate for printing and foiling since it does have a number of different qualities that are acetate-like. If you’ve watched my video about making print and cut foil acetate embellishments, then you know what great results you can get with clear acetate.

* A number of Amazon.com reviews of the Strathmore laser vellum state that it printed cleanly, so it may just be that my printer doesn’t agree with it.

Check out the video below to see my results, both with the vellum and with the Dura-Lar:

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Love Always SVG Digital Stamps + Border Die Cuts

Vellum-Type Papers Tested

Silhouette Vellum ( AMZ // SSS )
Ampad Vellum (purchased from big box store)
Strathmore Laser Vellum
Grafix Matte .005 Dura-Lar Film – 9″ x 12″ (recommended)

Other Supplies

Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 6″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Reactive Foil, Rose Gold
Heidi Swapp Minc Reactive Foil, Teal
Heidi Swapp Minc Reactive Foil, White
Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK )
a laser printer
plain printer paper
craft scissors

Video : Testing Minc Reactive Paint, Mist & Screen Ink with Uncoated Papers

Video : Testing Minc Reactive Paint, Mist & Screen Ink with Uncoated & Textured Papers (Watercolor Paper Incl.)

If you have a Minc or a laminator or other hot foiling machine, then you’ve undoubtedly tested out a bunch of different papers for hot foiling. You’ve probably also discovered that smooth, coated papers give you the best results. The reason for this is because the best hot foiling results are produced when the toner from the laser printer sits on top of the surface of the paper or cardstock that you’re foiling, so there’s as much toner as possible available to bond with the foil as it’s run through the Minc or whatever machine you’re using. My favorites, and the cardstocks that I’ve gotten the best and most consistent results with, are Hammermill Color Copy Digital Cover, which is 80lb weight, and Neenah Solar White, also 80lb weight.

But just as there are cardstocks that product great results, there are also types of paper and cardstock that I just can’t seem to get good results with. For instance, I still haven’t found a black cardstock that works really well. And uncoated and textured papers like kraft and watercolor paper allow the laser toner to absorb too much to produce good results.

Since the Minc reactive mediums – Reactive Paint, Reactive Mist, and Reactive Screen Ink – are designed to fuse with foil, no laser printer needed, I wanted to test them out on some types of paper and cardstock that are typically tough, if not impossible, to get great results with if you use the laser printer method of hot foiling. These mediums could provide a lot of new options for adding foil details and accents to our paper crafts projects.

Watch the video below to see my results:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Small Circles Stencil Die Cuts

Heidi Swapp Minc Liquid Toner Reactive Paint ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Liquid Toner Reactive Mist ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Liquid Toner Reactive Screen Ink ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 6″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Therm O Web Deco Foil, Rainbow ( AMZ // SBK )
Canson XL Watercolor Paper
Bazzill Licorice Twist Cardstock
uncoated kraft cardstock
an old gift card or credit card (for applying screen ink)
an old / inexpensive paintbrush – I like this set from Crayola because it’s inexpensive and includes 5 different size brushes
scrap paper
painter’s tape

Video : Hybrid Cardmaking with Love Always Digital Collection

Clean and Simple Hybrid Cardmaking with Love Always Digital Collection from k.becca

In this week’s video, I’ll show you just a few ways that you can use the patterns and hand lettered sentiments in the Love Always digital collection to create hybrid cards that are clean, simple, and modern.

Clean and Simple Hybrid Cardmaking with Love Always Digital Collection from k.becca

In addition to using some of the designs in the geometric card front cut files collection, I also incorporated diy hot foil acetate embellishments that you can learn how to make right here. This sweet trio of cards took less than half an hour to put together, so they’re pretty AND quick to make.

Clean and Simple Hybrid Cardmaking with Love Always Digital Collection from k.becca

Check out the step-by-step in the video below:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Love Always Digital Patterned Papers
Love Always SVG Digital Stamps + Border Die Cuts
A2 Card Front Die Cut Sets

C-Line Transparency Film for Plain Paper/Laser Printers
Heidi Swapp Minc Gold Reactive Foil ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Rose Gold Reactive Foil ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Red Reactive Foil ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK )
Hammermill Color Copy Digital Cover 80lb. cardstock
Simon Says Stamp Woodgrain Cardstock
a laser printer
plain printer paper
Kool Tak Clear Foam Pads
Tombow Mono Aqua Liquid Glue
double-sided tape
craft scissors

Clean and Simple Hybrid Cardmaking with Love Always Digital Collection from k.becca

Video : How to Make Print & Cut Foil Acetate Embellishments

Video : How to Make Print & Cut Hot Foil Acetate Embellishments

When you create foil elements using the heat activated method of running a laser printed piece through a Minc, a heat laminator, or other type of hot foiling machine, you need a nice, smooth surface, one that will not allow too much of the laser printer toner to absorb into the paper. This is why it’s difficult to get great diy hot foiling results with uncoated and textured papers, like watercolor paper and kraft cardstock.

Acetate is an ideal surface for diy hot foiling. It’s slick, glossy, and non-porous, so the laser printer toner sits right on top of the surface, ready to bond with the foil as it’s run through your foiling machine. In the video below, I’ll show you how to hot foil acetate and cut it using a digital die cutting machine (I use a Silhouette Cameo) to create some very cool, foil embellishments that you can use for cardmaking, scrapbooking, and many other types of craft projects.

I’ve been die cutting acetate for years, but this was the first time that I attempted a print and cut project on acetate, and I initially ran into some challenges with the registration process because of the shiny, reflective surface of the acetate, but I figured out a technique that has worked perfectly every time I’ve tried it, and it doesn’t require much effort at all.

DIY Print & Cut Hot Foil Acetate Embellishments

My Technique : Open a blank document in Silhouette Studio, activate the registration marks for your die cutting machine (just like you’d do for a regular print & cut project), and print the page with just the registration marks. After the page is printed, cut out each of the registration marks, trimming the cut pieces where necessary so the paper doesn’t overlap any of the areas on the acetate that will be die cut.

Then, hold the acetate up to a lamp, with the paper registration mark (with double-sided tape on the back of the paper) held over it, so the light shines through both and allows you to line them up perfectly. Tape the paper registration mark in place over the corresponding registration mark on the acetate and repeat the process for each of the registration marks. You can also use a window (if it’s daylight) or a lightbox to line up the registration marks. Once all of the paper registration marks are taped in place, register and die cut the acetate with your die cutting machine.

DIY Print & Cut Hot Foil Acetate Embellishments

A Note About Hot Off the Press Heat Resistant Acetate : This is a craft supply that many of us have in our stash, and I thought that it might work well for hot foiling since it’s heat resistant. Unfortunately, when I printed on it, lines of toner came off of the printed areas as it was being run through the printer and remelted around the printed areas. You can see what I’m talking about in the video below, starting at around the 1:50 mark.

Check out the video to see the step-by-step process for creating awesome hot foil acetate embellishments:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Love Always SVG Digital Stamps + Border Die Cuts

C-Line Transparency Film for Plain Paper/Laser Printers
Heidi Swapp Minc Light Pink Reactive Foil ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK )
a laser printer
plain printer paper
double-sided tape
craft scissors

Video : Using a Paintbrush with Heidi Swapp Minc Reactive Mist

Using a Paintbrush with the Heidi Swapp Minc Reactive Mist (Video)

After I posted my testing and review of the Heidi Swapp Minc Reactive Paint and Reactive Mist, a few of you asked whether you can use a paintbrush with the Reactive Mist just like you can with the Reactive Paint. The answer is a big ol’ yes!

Both the Reactive Mist and Reactive Paint offer a number of options and possibilities for those of you who don’t have a laser printer but would like to add foil accents and details to your projects. In the video below, I’ll explore just a couple of ways that you can use a paintbrush with the Reactive Mist to create custom patterns and elements that you can then foil with the Minc.

NOTES : Two of the biggest things to remember when you’re painting with the Minc Reactive Mist are 1) hold onto the bottle (if you can remember) when you dip your brush into it, or you may end up with a mess on your hands (and work surface) and 2) make sure that the Reactive Mist (or Reactive Paint, if that’s what you’re using) is COMPLETELY dry before running your pieces through the Minc. I use a folded piece of printer paper as a transfer folder for projects where I use the Mist or Paint, just in case, because any area that’s still wet can be pushed outward (and onto your transfer folder) as the piece is being run through the Minc. If this happens and it’s only a small area, then it’s usually not a big deal but, if it’s a larger area, then your transfer folder could be ruined.

Check out the video below to see some of the things that you can do when you use a paintbrush with the Minc Reactive Mist:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Hand Lettered Love Die Cut

Heidi Swapp Minc Light Pink Reactive Foil ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Matte Champagne Reactive Foil ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Liquid Toner Reactive Mist ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 6″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK ) – if you’re making a custom die cut for the card
Hammermill Color Copy Digital Cover 80lb. cardstock
an old / inexpensive paintbrush – I like this set from Crayola because it’s inexpensive and includes 5 different size brushes
a small container with water (to soak the paintbrush after use)
plain printer paper
Tombow Mono Multi Liquid Glue
a double-sided adhesive runner
3L Foam Adhesive Squares
craft scissors