My New Favorite Ink Blending Tool for Cardmaking (Video)

My New Favorite Ink Blending Tool for Cardmaking (Video)

If you’ve struggled with getting nice, smooth ink blending results for your cardmaking projects, then you’re definitely not alone. I’ve never been able to get great results with the popular tools on the market and have been looking for something that would work for me for a while. Part of my problem, I’m sure, is my own. I’m not terribly patient and have had a hard time getting the light, even hand that’s needed to get those great results with the popular ink blending tools. However, I’ve found something that’s been working really great for me, and that something is … makeup blending sponges!

The makeup sponges that I’ve been using are the dense foam, teardrop-shaped sponges that are typically used to apply foundation to the face, and I’m loving the ink blending results that I’m getting with them. Because the sponges don’t have any hard edges, they’re more forgiving, which makes it easier to get smooth ink blending results. Also, the larger sponges have great coverage for larger areas like ink blended card backgrounds. But, if you tend to use ink blending techniques in smaller areas, smaller sponges are also available.

I don’t have a different sponge for every ink or ink color that I use. I just have different ones for the main colors that I use, and sponges for light, medium, and dark tones of colors that I use most often. I’ve been storing them in a plastic box with dividers (I think it was meant for jewelry supplies and things like that), and I label each divided area with a card that has a color that represents what’s on the sponge. If you want a peek at that, I share it in the video.

Check out the video below to see examples of the great results that I’ve been getting:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

BEAKEY 5 Pcs Makeup Sponge Set Blender Beauty Foundation Blending Sponge
Strathmore 300 Series Bristol Smooth Pad, 9×12 Sheets
American Crafts Heidi Swapp Minc Non Stick Mat (a piece of scrap paper would work here, too)
Ranger Distress Oxide, Peacock Feathers
Ranger Distress Oxide, Faded Jeans
Ranger Distress Ink Mini, Dried Marigold
Ranger Distress Ink Mini, Picked Raspberry
Ranger Distress Ink Mini, Abandoned Coral
Rekukos Plastic Jewelry Box Organizer
– paper towels (for blending off ink between colors, if needed)

For the Finished Card

Botanical Heart Card – A2 & A7 Cut Files (I used the standalone A2 card front cut file)
– a piece of scrap paper (for the sentiment)
Ek Tools Powder Tool
Versamark Ink
Pretty Pink Posh Love Sentiments Stamp Set
WOW! Opaque Bright White Embossing Powder
Darice Embossing Multi-Purpose Heat Tool
Nuvo Deluxe Adhesive
Scotch Foam Mounting Tape
– white cardstock for the card base
– a stamp block

My New Favorite Ink Blending Tool for Cardmaking (Video)

Silhouette Print & Cut Troubleshooting and Tips (Video)

Silhouette Print & Cut Troubleshooting and Tips (Video) #printandcut #silhouettecameo #silhouetteportrait

In this final (planned) video in the Silhouette Print & Cut tutorial series, I’ll walk you through the process of printing and cutting step-by-step. Along the way, I’ll share some tips and pointers that will help you avoid some of the common issues that can cause problems with print & cut, and at the end of the video I’ll cover some more advanced troubleshooting tips.

Check out the video below for a step-by-step walkthrough for print & cut on the Silhouette digital die cutting machine:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool

Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition

Neenah Solar White 80lb. Cardstock

Silhouette Printable Clear Sticker Paper

Brother HLL8360CDW Color Laser Printer

Also Mentioned in the Video

Calibrating the Silhouette for Proper Print & Cut Registration Alignment

How to Make a Print & Cut Image from a Regular Cut File in Silhouette Studio (Video)

 

How to Make Print & Cut Files from Regular Cut Files in Silhouette Studio #silhouettecameo #svgfiles #printandcut

Have you ever wanted to know how to make a print & cut image from a regular cut file? In this video, I’ll show you how!

I’ve touched on this a little bit in a couple of the earlier videos in my Silhouette Print & Cut tutorial series, but in today’s video I’ll be using a more complex file that actually needs to be reassembled, and I think that these are often just the types of cut files that we’re looking to turn into images for print and cut. We’ll even personalize our print & cut gift tags to make them our own!

Tip : The Align options in the Transform panel in Silhouette Studio are super helpful for files that you need to reassamble because you can line the pieces up perfectly for printing and cutting.

Check out the video below for a step-by-step tutorial about coloring and reassembling regular cut files to make print & cut images:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Little Houses Snow Globe Cut Files
Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool
Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition
Neenah Solar White 80lb. cardstock
Canon Pixma iX6520 Printer

How to Make Print & Cut Files from Regular Cut Files in Silhouette Studio (Video) #silhouettecameo #svgfiles #printandcut

How to Make Custom Color Palettes for Print & Cut in Silhouette Studio (Video)

How to Make Custom Color Palettes for Print & Cut in Silhouette Studio (Video) #silhouettestudio #printandcut

If you’re ready to go beyond using the default color options and color picker tool to choose custom colors for your print & cut projects in Silhouette Studio, then this video in my Silhouette Print & Cut tutorial series is the one for you! I’ll show you how to find color inspiration and create your own, custom color palettes for print & cut in Silhouette Studio using several different resources that are available to you on the web for FREE.

In the video, I’ll also show you how to make a custom color chart using the free printable color chart that you can download in my post about getting better color print results for print and cut.

Check out the video to learn how to make custom color palettes for print & cut projects:

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

FREE Printable Silhouette Studio Color Chart
Neenah Solar White 80lb. cardstock
Canon Pixma iX6520 Printer

Websites Referenced in the Video

Color-Hex
Canva Color Palette Generator
My Pinterest Color Inspiration Board
Web Color Tools
HTML Colors from Image

Folk Art Village Cut File Assembly Instructions

Folk Art Village Cut File Assembly Instructions

These folk art-inspired village houses have been bumping around in my head for quite a while, and I’m so happy with how they turned out! In the video below, I’ll show you a step-by-step assembly tutorial for House 1, but all of the houses in the collection are assembled in the same way, so once you’ve put one together, you’ll know how to put them all together.

Each house only took me about 15-20 minutes to assemble, so it was about an hour and a half to put all five together.

Tip : If you notice that your cardstock or vellum is warping after you add liquid glue, you can place the piece or pieces under something heavy like a coffee table book or two until they’re completely dry. This way, they’ll dry flat.

Original Dimensions for all of the File Pieces

House 1

House Front : 6.2958 in. W x 7.6083 in. H
House Back : 6.2958 in. W x 7.3083 in. H
Roof Layer (optional) : 3 in. W x 5.6324 in. H
Window Piece 1 : 2.8518 in. W x 6.6945 in. H
Window Piece 2 (Cut 2) : 2.8 in. W x 3.2861 in. H

House 2

House Front : 8.3028 in. W x 7.3039 in. H
House Back : 8.3028 in. W x 7 in. H
Roof Layer (optional) : 4 in. W x 5.0056 in. H
Window Piece 1 : 3.8426 in. W x 5.7963 in. H
Window Piece 2 (Cut 2) : 3.85 in. W x 3.35 in. H

House 3

House Front : 6.3028 in. W x 5.8028 in. H
House Back : 6.3028 in. W x 5.5 in. H
Roof Layer (optional) : 3 in. W x 5 in. H
Window Piece 1 : 2.8611 in. W x 4.8611 in. H
Window Piece 2 (Cut 2) : 2.25 in. W x 2.25 in. H
Roof Window Piece : 1.3611 in. W x 1.2824 in. H

House 4

House Front : 8.3 in. W x 7.2194 in. H
House Back : 8.3 in. W x 6.9203 in. H
Roof Layer (optional) : 4 in. W x 9.848 in. H
Window Piece 1 : 3.8403 in. W x 6.1806 in. H
Window Piece 2 (Cut 2) : 3.75 in. W x 1.5 in. H
Roof Window Piece : 3.75 in. W x 1.125 in. H

House 5

House Front : 9.3 in. W x 5.9972 in. H
House Back : 9.3 in. W x 5.6992 in. H
Roof Layer (optional) : 4.5 in. W x 5.408 in. H
Window Piece 1 : 4.2917 in. W x 4.2986 in. H
Window Piece 2 (Cut 2) : 4.25 in. W x 2.25 in. H
Roof Window Piece : 1.25 in. W x 1.4444 in. H

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Folk Art Village : House 1 Cut Files
Folk Art Village : House 2 Cut Files
Folk Art Village : House 3 Cut Files
Folk Art Village : House 4 Cut Files
Folk Art Village : House 5 Cut Files
Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool
Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition
Bazzill Smoothie Cardstock, Coconut Swirl
My Favorite Things Red Hot Card Stock
Bazzill Basics 8 1/2″ x 11″ Vellum Sheets, 40lb.
Scor-Tape, 1/4 inch (for all of the house tabs)
Scor-Tape, 5/8 inch (for the roof layers)
Nuvo Deluxe Adhesive
– craft scissors (optional, to cut the tape)

Tips for Better Print Results for Silhouette Print & Cut – FREE Printable Color Chart (Video)

Tips for Better Print Results Silhouette Print & Cut (FREE Printable Silhouette Studio Color Chart) #silhouettecameo #printandcut
In this video in my Silhouette Print & Cut tutorial series, I’ll share some tips for getting better print results when printing from Silhouette Studio.

First up, I talk a little bit about the two major color modes that you’ll encounter when working with any design software, and those modes are RGB (Red / Green / Blue) and CMYK (Cyan / Magenta / Yellow / Key (Black)).

RGB & CMYK Color Modes

The RGB color system is based on light. It’s called an “additive” system because the different colors are created by adding and mixing different variations of red, green, and blue light together. The more light that you add, the lighter the color will be. So, you can see in the image above (left), in the center area where all of the colors overlap at their highest intensity, the color that you get is white. Because RGB colors are communicated via light, the RGB color mode includes many super bright and vivid colors that you cannot get with the CMYK color mode, so the RGB spectrum offers a larger range of colors overall.

The CMYK color system is what is called a “subtractive” system and is based on pigments and how they’re either absorbed into or reflected off of a surface. Another name for it could be an “absorbative” system. You can see on the image above (right), in the center area where all of the colors overlap at their highest intensity, the color that you get is black. This is because black absorbs all color, so you can throw the max amounts of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black in there, and black will absorb them all. Different colors in this system are created by subtracting and mixing different variations of the four pigments, so the more pigment you subtract, the lighter the color or tone will be (in other words, lighter colors absorb less and reflect more), and when you subtract the max amount of all of the four pigments, you end up with the color white, which reflects all color and doesn’t absorb any.

Because printed surfaces like paper and fabric don’t emit light, colors in the CMYK system don’t tend to be as bright or vivid as colors on the screen, and the overall color range is more limited than the RGB system is.

In Silhouette Studio, you don’t have the ability to switch between color modes like you do in design software like Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator, but you can import clipart and images in either of the color modes and work with them in Studio.

Since Silhouette Studio offers less color management options than other design software, if you’re getting less than stellar print results when printing for print & cut projects, you can use some other tricks to adjust your image for better color results.

Your printers preference and options window will pop up when you click to print, and making changes to certain settings in this area that can make a big difference in your print results. Different brands of printers offer different print preferences and options, so what you see in your printer dialog window will be different than what I see in mine, unless we have the same printer. For my inkjet printer, which is a Canon Pixma iX6520, one option that makes a noticeable difference in my results is the Print Quality option. When I set it to High (vs. Standard), my colors are richer and more saturated. So, if you’re experiencing prints that are on the light site or a little bit washed out, try setting your printer to the highest quality print setting.

You may also have options for adjusting color tints, contrast, and intensity. Unless you’re noticing that your printer is consistently printing colors with, say, a green tint, or colors aren’t as intense or rich as you’d like on a regular basis, I would recommending making adjustments to individual images in your design software instead of changing settings within your printer because doing something like adjusting a color tint and leaving your printer set that way could actually cause images that would otherwise print fine to have color casts. But settings like contrast and intensity are definitely an option if you’re noticing that your images are too light or washed out in all of your print results.

Another good idea is to make test prints. I have a FREE printable .studio3 file with a color chart for the default Fill Panel options in Silhouette Studio that you can download below and use for your own test prints. I’ve included fill-in areas for paper / cardstock type and printer brand / model, too. I print this color chart on the brands of cardstock that I use most often so I can see how those default colors look when printed out.

In the video, I’ll also show you how to make subtle adjustments to images using the Image Effects Panel in Silhouette Studio, and these small adjustments can definitely make a big different in your printed results.

Check out the video below for tips on getting print results with Silhouette print & cut:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

FREE Printable Silhouette Studio Color Chart
Hammermill Color Copy Digital Cover 80lb.
Neenah Solar White 80lb. cardstock
Brother HLL8360CDW Color Laser Printer
Canon Pixma iX6520 Printer
Cupcake Cuties Christmas Clip Art

Tips for Better Print Results Silhouette Print & Cut (FREE Printable Silhouette Studio Color Chart) #silhouettecameo #printandcut

Silhouette Print & Cut Tutorial – How to Color Digital Stamps in Silhouette Studio (Video)

Silhouette Print & Cut Tutorial - How to Color Digital Stamps in Silhouette Studio (Video) #printandcut #silhouettestudio #silhouettecameo #svgfiles

When you’re working with digital stamps (aka black and white line art images), you’ll often print and cut the stamps for coloring with a physical coloring medium like colored pencils or markers. But what if you want to color your digital stamps right in Silhouette Studio and transform them into full color images for print & cut?

In this video in my Silhouette Print & Cut tutorial series, I’ll show you some different ways to color digital stamps in Silhouette Studio, and I include methods for the premium versions (Designer Edition and above) and the basic free version of the software, so you can use these methods whether you have an SVG / vector file or a PNG or JPG / raster file!

Check out the video below for the step-by-step:

Silhouette Print & Cut Tutorial – How to Color & Recolor Images in Silhouette Studio (Video)

Silhouette Print & Cut Tutorial - How to Color & Recolor Images in Silhouette Studio (Video) #silhouettecameo #silhouettestudio #printandcut

When you’re working with images for print & cut, you’ll often want to either add color (if it’s an SVG or another vector file) or recolor the image (if it’s a raster file, like a PNG or JPG), and in the video below I’ll show you how to color & recolor different types of images for print & cut using the tools and features available in Silhouette Studio.

Here’s a little summary:

For Vector Files (including file types SVG // STUDIO // GSD // DXF // PDF // AI // EPS // CDR)

Use the Fill Color Panel to color and recolor images. Options include:

  • Fill Color : allows you to fill the image with a solid color, either from the default color palette (click the color square for the color you’d like to use while the image is selected) or by choosing a custom color by inputting the HSL values (hue, saturation, light), the RGB values (red, green, blue), or the hex code (a 6 character alphanumeric code for the color).
  • Gradient Fill : the middle icon at the top of the Fill Color Panel, which includes default gradient fill options, as well as advanced options so you can customize your gradient.
  • Pattern Fill : the right icon at the top of the Fill Color Panel, which allows you to choose from a default set of pattern fills. This sub-panel also includes options for rotating, scaling, and panning the pattern. You can use your own pattern fills by either dragging and dropping a pattern from your computer or by clicking on the fill pattern after loading it into your Silhouette library. Note : because pattern fills are raster files, their size and resolution is limited, so I recommend not scaling the file up too much because, if you do, it could print out fuzzy and low quality.

In addition, if you fill a vector image with a gradient fill or a pattern fill, you can use the Image Effects Panel (the little half-filled circle icon on the far right menu in Silhouette Studio 4) to adjust and recolor the fills.

For Raster Files (including file types PNG // JPG // GIF // BMP // TIFF)

Use the Image Effects Panel to adjust and recolor raster files. The Image Effects Panel offers several very useful options for adjusting the color on raster images in Silhouette Studio:

  • Grey Shade : this option will add a grey tone to your image and, if you slide the slider the whole way to the right, you can transform your image to greyscale.
  • Colorize* : using the Hue slider in this option will allow you to completely change the color scheme of your image. Slide the slider around to see all of the different options. Many won’t look great, but you’ll usually hit upon several color schemes that will work well as you slide the slider around.
  • Contrast, Brightness & Saturation* : if your image is printing out on the dull side, these sliders can be a great help. Increasing the Contrast slider can help more details in your image stand out when printed. Increasing the Brightness slider can brighten up your image, and increasing the Saturation slider makes the colors in your image more vivid and bright.
  • Gamma : this option controls lightness and intensity. Sliding the slider to the left will darken and intensify your image, while sliding it to the right will make the image lighter and softer.
  • Invert : this option inverts the colors in your image to the colors opposite them on the color wheel. For example, reds and pinks will change to greens and blues will change to oranges. Sliding the slider to 100 will fully invert the colors. I don’t really use this option because the results aren’t typically great looking.
  • Sepia* : this option adds a sepia tone (a warm, yellow-ish brown) to your images. It’s great if you want to make your images to have an aged or vintage look.
  • Tint* : this option is very useful if your image has a color cast. Use the red, green, and blue sliders to either remove a color cast or to add a tint to an image. Subtle adjustments are best. I like adding a subtle bit of red to warm and brighten an image that’s too blue or has a blue-ish tint, and I also like to use the blue slider to either warm up an image that’s too cool or has a blue-ish tint (slide it to the left to add a warm, yellow tint) or to cool it off if it’s too yellow / orange (slide it to the right to add a cool, blue tint).
  • Shadow : this option doesn’t really work with raster images because Silhouette Studio registers the bounding box on a raster image as the image border, but it is useful for adding shadows to vector images.

* denotes my favorite and most used options in the Image Effects Panel

Check out the video to see all of these options in action:

 

Silhouette Print & Cut Tutorial - How to Color & Recolor Images in Silhouette Studio (Video) #silhouettecameo #silhouettestudio #printandcut

Silhouette Print and Cut Tutorial – How to Make Border Cut Lines for Images (Video)

Silhouette Print and Cut Tutorial – How to Make Border Cut Lines for Images (Video)

When you’re working with clipart and images for print & cut, you’re often dealing with just an image and no cut lines. In the video below, I’ll show you how to create custom border cut lines for different types of images, including raster (PNG graphics with transparent backgrounds) and vector (SVG files that you want to transform from cut files to print & cut files).

In addition to the images that I use in the video, you can also make cut lines for any type of print & cut friendly raster and vector graphics that you can work with in Silhouette Studio. The trace and offset features in Silhouette Studio are your best friends when it comes to making cut lines for images, and they each offer different styles and options so you can create and customize cut lines for many, many types of images, including images with backgrounds that are a color besides white. You may have to play around and experiment with the various trace and offset options to get good cut line results for more challenging graphics, but in most instances it’s doable.

This video is part of my Silhouette Print & Cut Tutorial video series.

Check out the video below for a step-by-step tutorial on creating border cut lines for images in Silhouette Studio:

Silhouette Print and Cut Tutorial – Raster & Vector Images : What’s the Difference? (Video)

Silhouette Print and Cut Tutorial – Raster & Vector Images : What's the Difference? (Video)

Raster vs. vector images – what’s the difference? In this video in my Silhouette Print & Cut Tutorial Series, I’ll explain the differences between the two categories of image files and why you would want to use each for printing and cutting.

Here’s a summary of what’s covered in the video:

Raster Images (file types : PNG // JPG // GIF // BMP // TIFF)

  • Resolution Dependent : resolution and file dimensions dictate the maximum size of the image, and you can usually scale the image down without problems but have very limited flexibility if you need to scale the image up.
  • Common Resolutions : 72 dpi / ppi (low resolution / web resolution) and 300 dpi / ppi (high resolution / print resolution)
  • Why Use : raster graphics are capable of rendering complex images with lots of detail, and pretty much any photograph or image that you see with that level of detail is a raster graphic. Also, these images can have lots of texture, soft gradients of color, and itty bitty small details, which make them more visually interesting. Raster file sizes are larger, but raster graphics are much stronger when it comes to the small details than vector images.

Vector Images (file types : SVG // STUDIO // GSD // DXF // PDF // AI // EPS // CDR)

  • Resolution Independent : while raster images are made from individual pixels, vector images are made up of paths, each of which has a fancy mathematical formula associated with it that tells the path how it’s shaped and what fill color and / or stroke weight and color it has. No matter how small or large you make a vector graphic, the mathematical equation will remain the same, so vector graphics can be scaled to any size without losing quality.
  • Can Be Saved As Raster Files : you can save a vector file as a raster file. For example, you can save an SVG as a PNG or a JPEG, but if you do this, the resulting file will be resolution dependent and won’t be able to be scaled to a size that’s larger than the size that you save it as without losing image quality. Raster files, on the other hand, cannot be saved as true vector files. They can be embedded in vector files, but they won’t actually be vector files.
  • Why Use : the big plus with vector images is their scalability. Their file sizes tend to be smaller, which is a plus, but they tend to have large areas of flat color, as opposed to lots of texture and color. You can recolor vector graphics in Silhouette Studio, which is another plus.

Check out the video below to find out more about the differences between raster and vector images:

Silhouette Print and Cut Tutorial – Page Setup & Registration Marks (Video)

Silhouette Print & Cut Tutorial - Page Setup & Registration Marks (Video)

The print and cut feature of Silhouette digital die cutting machines is what first attracted me to them years ago, and I love all of the options that this feature offers, especially if you’re into stickers, card making, and paper crafts.

This video is the first in a series of print and cut tutorial videos that will take you through beginner level through more advanced techniques using print & cut. In this first video, I’ll show you, step-by-step, how to set up your page for printing and cutting, and I’ll show you the options that are available for setting up registration marks.

I’m using Silhouette Studio Designer Edition in these videos, but most everything that I’m doing is available in the free version of Silhouette Studio, so you can follow along and become a print & cut pro over the next several weeks!

Check out the print and cut tutorial video below:

Free Printable Halloween Sticker Sheets (Print & Cut Files Included)

Free Printable Halloween Sticker Sheets from k.becca (Print & Cut Files Included)

Halloween is on its way, and these stickers will add a spooky cute touch to Halloween treat bags, boxes, and party favors. And, if you have a digital die cutting machine, you can even make these frightfully fun sticker sheets a part of your trick or treats because print & cut files for Silhouette, Cricut, and other machines are included in your download!

The stickers include a happy jack-o-lantern, a ghost, candy corn, wrapped candies, a skull, and some hand lettered Halloween sayings, and your download includes a printable PDF, plus SVG print & cut files for Silhouette machines and high resolution PNG files that will work for print then cut on the Cricut. A trace file is also included for those of you who have the free version of Silhouette Studio and aren’t able to work with SVG files.

If you’re already a member of The Yay List, simply enter your email below to unlock the freebie. Your email will not be added again.

Free Printable Halloween Sticker Sheets from k.becca (Print & Cut Files Included)

Silhouette Sketch + Heat Embossing Resist Watercolor Backgrounds (Video)

Silhouette Sketch + Heat Embossing Resist Watercolor Backgrounds (Video) #cardmaking

The Silhouette sketch + heat embossing technique is super versatile. You can use it with colored embossing powder to create everything from metallic, heat embossed sentiments to fun backgrounds using colored embossing powders.

I love using this technique to make emboss resist backgrounds for watercoloring, and in the video below I’ll show you how to make this fall-inspired card using a sketch file and Prima Marketing Decadent Pies Watercolors, which include a range of muted colors that are perfect for fall.

Silhouette Sketch + Heat Embossing Resist Watercolor Backgrounds (Video) #cardmaking

I finished the card by using two print and cut elements from the Happy Fall Digital Journaling + Elements set, and I share a handy tip about covering printer mistakes, too!

Check out the step-by-step tutorial (including how to set up the file to sketch & cut in Silhouette Studio) in the video below:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Leaf Border + Background Cut Files
Happy Fall Journaling Cards + Elements
Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool
Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition
Canson XL Watercolor Paper
EK Tools Powder Tool
Sakura Quickie Glue Pen
WOW Embossing Powder, Opaque Bright White
Prima Marketing Watercolor Confections : Decadent Pies
Scor-Tape, 5/8″
Fiskars Personal Paper Trimmer
Brother HLL8360CDW Color Laser Printer (for the print & cut elements)
Neenah Solar White 80lb. cardstock
Nuvo Clear Drying Craft Glue
– two containers of water (one for clean, one for rinsing the brush)
– a paper towel
– a small round paintbrush

Silhouette Sketch + Heat Embossing Resist Watercolor Backgrounds (Video) #cardmaking

Silhouette Print & Cut Card Making with Koh-I-Noor Tri-Tone Pencils (Video)

Silhouette Print & Cut Card Making with Koh-i-noor Tri-tone Pencils (Video Tutorial)

A little while back, I received a set of Koh-I-Noor Tri-Tone Pencils as a gift, and I wasn’t really sure what to do with them at first. But once I started using them, I really liked the dynamic, impressionist-style look that they give to projects. In other words, I think they’re pretty cool!

If you want to have complete control over your colored pencils, then this probably isn’t the set for you, but I like the element of surprise that comes along with the Tri-Tone pencils and think that they would make a great set for beginners because they allow you to more quickly and easily create color variation and depth of color, both of which can be a big challenge when you’re first starting out with colored pencils.

Silhouette Print & Cut Card Making with Koh-i-noor Tri-tone Pencils (Video Tutorial)

Layering color is absolutely key when it comes to colored pencils – and many different coloring mediums, actually – so I started off by laying down a few very light layers of color, gradually building up the color and pressing harder to lay down deeper color as I worked. After I was finished coloring the pumpkins, I colored a very loose sky and grass background on the card base, also using the Koh-I-Noor Tri-Tone pencils.

I made this easy and colorful card using the Silhouette print & cut feature and the Happy Fall Digital Stamps set that you can find in my shop, and you can watch the step-by step tutorial in the video below.

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Happy Fall Digital Stamps + Dielines
Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool
Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition
Koh-I-Noor Tri-Tone Colored Pencils (Set of 12)
Brother HLL8360CDW Color Laser Printer
Neenah Solar White 80lb. cardstock
3L Foam Adhesive Squares
Nuvo Clear Drying Craft Glue
Duck Brand Double-Sided Adhesive Roller

Silhouette Print & Cut Card Making with Koh-i-noor Tri-tone Pencils (Video Tutorial)

Acrylic Pouring for Beginners, Making Cells with Silicone & Isopropyl Alcohol (Video)

Acrylic Pouring for Beginners, Cells with Silicone & Isopropyl Alcohol #acrylicpouring

Until now, I haven’t used any silicone additives in my acrylic pour paintings, so they’ve had more of a marbled look (which I love) and only have small cells, if any. Cells are one of the trademarks of acrylic pour paintings, and they add some seriously cool texture and variation (which I also love). In the video below, I’ll give you a step-by-step tutorial on how to use silicone oil plus isopropyl alcohol to create cells in your pour paintings.

My silicone oil is a treadmill belt lubricant that’s popular for using in acrylic pouring. It’s not too expensive, and it’s 100% silicone, which is what you want for pour paintings because additional ingredients can affect your results. This could be a good thing, but it could also be a not so good thing. I’ve seen people use everything from coconut oil to WD-4o (be sure to use the silicone-based WD-40) to create cells, so you’ve got a lot of options.

I used 4 drops of silicone oil per paint color (I didn’t used silicone oil in the white paint), and at first the cells were very subtle. But after I gave the painting a few spritzes of 91% isopropyl alcohol, the cells grew almost instantly. From there, I tipped the canvas panel around a little bit more to make the cells a bit larger, and the tilting also caused the cells to reshape themselves into more organic shapes, which I loved.

I’m really happy with this first attempt at creating cells, and I have so many more things that I want to try, like changing the amount of silicone oil that I use, adding the oil to all of the paints, seeing what happens if I don’t spray the painting with alcohol, etc. Acrylic pouring really does offer endless possibilities, and it’s always exciting to see how the next painting will flow!

Check out the video below to see how to create cells in acrylic pour paintings using silicone oil and isopropyl alcohol:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Husky Plastic Sheeting (or a large garbage bag / old newspapers / a bunch of plastic grocery bags / a painter’s dropcloth)

Foil Cookie Tray (to catch most of the excess paint as it runs off the edges of the painting – I purchased a set of 2 for $1.00 at the dollar store)

Vinyl Gloves (if you don’t want to be cleaning acrylic paint from under your fingernails for days, then use gloves – I buy mine by the box at Walmart in the cleaning supplies aisle)

Acrylic Craft Paints (in the video, I used Martha Stewart Wedding Cake & Beach Glass and Ceramcoat Black craft paints)

Pouring Medium (I make mine with a 1:1 ratio of Elmer’s Glue All and water)

Squeeze Bottle (I put the glue and water into this and shake it up until they’re well mixed. The squeeze bottles are a really easy way to dispense your pouring medium, and you can just put the cap back on when you’re not using so it doesn’t dry out)

Food Service Portion Cups (to hold the paint / pouring medium mixture – you can use any small plastic cups for this, or you can save yogurt containers or even plastic cat food containers and use those)

Wood Craft Sticks (to stir the paint / pouring medium mixture – I picked up a package of 100 for $1.00 at the dollar store, and once the paint is completely dry on them, you can reuse them)

Art Alternatives 8×10 Canvas Panels (if you want to hang your paintings on the wall, you should use a regular canvas, but I like these panels and buy them by the dozen from Amazon)

Plastic Shot Glasses (to raise the canvas off of the work surface so the paint can flow off the edges after you pour – I bought a package of 24 plastic shot glasses for $1.00 at the dollar store, but you can use food service containers, plastic yogurt containers, cat food containers, or even a small box under the canvas)

91% Isopropyl Rubbing Alcohol in a spritzer bottle to pop bubbles in the paint. You can spray this into the paint cups before pouring, spritz it onto the canvas after pouring, or both. Alcohol also helps to open up the cells in paintings when you’re using silicone oil.

Spot On 100% Silicone Treadmill Belt Lubricant to create cells in acrylic pour paintings. Combine with Isopropyl Alcohol for more pronounced cells.

Happy pouring!

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