Archive | Videos

Silhouette Sketch & Heat Embossing Technique Tutorial (Video)

Silhouette Sketch & Heat Embossing Technique Tutorial (Video) #silhouettecameo

The Sakura Quickie Glue Pen has been a game changer for me when it comes to sketching with my Silhouette Cameo. For months and months, I’ve been looking for something that would allow me to use the sketch pen function for heat embossing, but every heat embossing pen and marker that I tried just wasn’t giving me the results that I was looking for. This all changed when I found the Sakura Quickie Glue Pen, which was the solution that I was looking for to sketch and foil, too!

I love that this glue pen has a nice, fine tip, which creates thin and crisp sketched lines, so you’ll be able to get beautiful results even with more intricate and detailed sketch designs. It’s also still sticky for a while after it dries, which allows embossing powder to stick to it extremely well.

The embossing pens that I’ve used for testing this technique all have felt tips like markers, which makes it difficult to get consistent coverage across a sketch design because the ink flow isn’t as steady as it is with the glue pen. Plus, the ink can start to dry out, especially if it’s a larger design and takes more time to sketch. So, while embossing pens / markers are great for hand lettering and manually creating designs, the nature of the tips of these types of pens causes spotty coverage when you use them as sketch pens.

This technique should work with any digital die cutting machine that has a sketch pen option, so Cricut users, this tutorial is for you, too! If you are using a Cricut machine, I do recommend that you use the PNG (no border) version of this file and set it to Draw in Cricut Design Space.

Find out how to sketch and heat emboss (and see the results that I got with the embossing pens that I tried, too) in the video below:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Interlocking Circles Sketch Pattern Files
Silhouette Cameo
Sakura Quickie Glue Pen
Chomas Creations Adjustable Marker Holder for Silhouette
Neenah Solar White 80lb. Cardstock
EK Tools Powder Tool
Zing! Opaque Embossing Powder, Aqua
Darice Embossing Multi-Purpose Heat Tool
wood craft sticks

Silhouette Studio Pop Up Creator Tutorial (Video)

Silhouette Studio Pop Up Creator Tutorial (Video) #cardmaking #silhouettecameo

The Pop Up Creator feature that’s available in Silhouette Studio v. 4 and above makes is super easy to make fun and pretty pop up cards for any occasion! In the video below, I’ll take you through the process of turning a regular cut file into a pop up element for a card, including how to make a base shape for cut files that have lots of empty interior areas like the love heart cut file that I used. And, if you haven’t checked it out already, be sure to head over and watch my earlier video about making print & cut pop up cards using clip art. So many pop up possibilities!

The Silhouette Studio Pop Up Creator has extended features that are available in the premium Designer Edition and above, but all of the features that I used in the video are available with the free version of Silhouette Studio, too.

I think that this pop up cardmaking thing could become an addiction!

Check out the video to see how to make a pop up card in Silhouette Studio v. 4.1:

Supplies Used in This Project

Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool
Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition (optional)
Love Heart Cut File
Zig Squeeze & Roll Glue Pen, Fine Tip
Scor-Tape, .25 Inch
– white and hot pink cardstock

Silhouette Sketch Glue Pen + Foiling With or Without a Minc / Laminator (Video)

Silhouette Sketch Pen + Heat Embossing Tutorial (Video) #silhouettecameo

I’m so excited to share this technique with you all because it’s something that I’ve been trying to get to work for months. In the video below, I’ll show you how to use the sketch pen function on a Silhouette Cameo (this should work with other Silhouette machines and Cricut machines, too), along with a fine point glue pen, to create sketch designs for foiling either with OR without a Minc foiling machine / heat laminator.

Being able to use a glue pen in this way opens up so many options for creating foiled designs, even if you don’t have a laser printer or something like the Minc. I’m so glad that the Sakura Quickie Glue Pens exist! I tried every glue pen and marker that I could find, including the DIY toner ink pens that I made with empty paint markers, and the Sakura pens have given me the best, most consistent results by far. And, if you don’t have a die cutting machine with a sketch pen option, then you can always create hand lettered and hand drawn designs for foiling, too!

TIP : I learned this genius tip when I first bought a Chomas Creations marker holder for the Silhouette (this is what I use as the pen holder in the video). Slide a wood craft stick / popsicle stick under the pen holder area on your die cutting machine. Then, lower the pen down into the holder until it JUST touches the craft stick and secure the glue pen in place. The wood craft sticks are just the right thickness to get most pens and markers that you use for sketching at just the right height to cleanly sketch out your design.

Check out the video to learn how to use the Sakura Quickie Glue Pen as a sketch pen to create designs for foiling:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Sprinkled With Love Sketch File

Silhouette Cameo
Heidi Swapp Minc 12″ Foiling Machine (optional)
Sakura Quickie Glue Pen
Deco Foil Transfer Sheets, Rainbow
Silhouette Pen Holder (the Medium size holder should work – unfortunately, I seem to have lost mine and wasn’t able to test it out for the video)
Chomas Creations Adjustable Marker Holder for Silhouette (this is what I use in the video)
Neenah Solar White 80lb. Cardstock
Post-It Tape (optional)
wood craft sticks

How to Make Print & Cut Pop Up Cards in Silhouette Studio 4.1 (Video)

How to Make Print & Cut Pop Up Cards in Silhouette Studio 4.1 #silhouettecameo

The new Pop-Up Creator feature in Silhouette Studio v. 4 and above makes it super easy to make pop up cards from pretty much any clip art that you have. In this video tutorial, I’ll give you a step-by-step walkthrough for designing a print & cut pop up card using clip art from the Mum’s Garden collection. The entire interior design for this card is one layer, so everything needs to fit inside the registration marks in Silhouette Studio. Because of this, I made a 4 bar size card, which is a little bit smaller than an A2 or A7 size.

The dimensions for the interior rectangle (the piece with all of the clip art images) are 3 inches wide by 9.25 inches tall. I also made a full size base for the card (it’s a regular cut file, no printing involved), and that piece is 3.5 inches wide by 9.75 inches tall. If you want to be able to make a larger print and cut card, you can design the image on the pop up element as a separate piece that will fit over top of the pop up base shape. Then, just make the pop up base a regular cut file and print & cut the image or images separately.

The Silhouette Studio Pop Up Creator has extended features that are available in the premium Designer Edition and above, but all of the features that I used in the video are available with the free version of Silhouette Studio, too.

Check out the video to see how to make a print & cut pop up card in Silhouette Studio v. 4.1:

Supplies Used in This Project

Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool
Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition (optional)
Mum’s Garden Digital Clip Art
– a printer (I used a Brother HLL8360CDW color laser printer for this project)
Scor-Tape, .25 Inch
– white cardstock

How to Make Print & Cut Pop Up Cards in Silhouette Studio 4.1 #silhouettecameo

Silhouette Mint Stamps + Distress Oxide Reinkers (Video)

Testing Silhouette Mint Stamps with Distress Ink Reinkers

I’ve tried many non-Silhouette Mint brand inks with the Silhouette Mint stamps and have had mixed results. The great news is that are are definitely some other brands of ink that work well with Mint stamps, and in this video I’m testing Distress Oxide ink to see how it works with the Mint stamps.

In a past video, I tested regular Distress Inks (both an inkpad and a reinker) with the Mint stamps and had decent results. The results with a Distress Ink reinker were better than the results with a Distress inkpad. Not fantastic, but not terrible, either. The Distress Oxide inks are different than regular Distress inks because the oxide inks are a water reactive dye & pigment ink hybrid, and you can get some pretty cool and unique results because of this unique formulation. Regular Distress inks are water based dye inks, so the formulation is more straightforward.

When Distress Oxide inks were first released, they were only available as inkpads, but reinkers are now available, and that’s what I tested with because the reinkers are applied to the Mint stamps in the same way as the Silhouette Mint brand inks. I figured we’d have the best chance at great results using the reinker.

I was pretty happy with the results and was able to get at least a dozen consistently good stamped impressions in a row with the Distress Oxide ink and the Silhouette Mint stamp after I stamped off the excess ink and before the ink started to dry out.

TIPS : The Distress Oxide ink absorbs into the Mint stamps very quickly, so I recommend leaving the ink to absorb after the stamp is full inked for only about 2 to 3 minutes, instead of the 8 to 10 minutes that I usually allow the Mint stamps to sit and absorb the Mint brand inks. Also, I don’t recommend wiping or blotting off the excess ink from the stamps before starting to stamp because, when I did this, even the first stamped impressions were on the lighter side. Just leave the excess ink on the stamp and start stamping onto cardstock, paper, etc. You should be able to stamp off the excess ink within 10 impressions, and then you’ll get consistently clean and crisp stamped impressions for about a dozen or so impressions before the ink starts to dry out.

You can spritz the stamp after the ink dries out to reactivate any ink that remains in the stamp, but these stamped impressions will be lighter and will have a watercolor-y look since some of the water will absorb up into the stamp.

Check out the video below to see all of the results:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Classic Wreath Monograms Font (for the stamp design)

Silhouette Mint Custom Stamp Maker
Silhouette Mint Stamp Kits (with the stamp base / block) – I used the 45×45 mm size in the video
Silhouette Mint Stamp Sheet Sets (just stamp sheets)
Neenah Solar White 80lb. Cardstock
Tim Holtz Distress Oxide Reinker, Faded Jeans
Ranger Tim Holtz Distress Sprayer
baby wipes

Acrylic Pour Painting for Beginners, Dirty Pour Flip Cup Tutorial (Video)

Acrylic Pour Painting for Beginners, Dirty Pour Flip Cup Technique (Video) #acrylicpouring

In a previous video about acrylic pour painting for beginners, I took you on a step-by-step walkthrough of all of the tools and supplies that I use when making my own acrylic pour paintings and showed you a very basic technique for creating them. In this video, I’ll show you how to make an acrylic pour painting using the dirty pour flip cup technique. There’s no dirt involved, I promise!

The dirty pour flip cup technique is one of my favorites for making pour paintings, and it’s super easy to do. You just pour all of the paint colors that you’re using for your painting into one cup, flip the cup onto your canvas, lift the cup, and go. It’s that simple!

I like to allow the cup with the paints in it to sit on the canvas for 15 to 20 seconds before lifting it (you’ll see me do this in the video below), and I also like to leave a little bit of paint in each individual cup in case I want to add it to the painting later (I do this for all of my acrylic pour paintings, not just paintings made using the dirty pour flip cup technique).

Check out the video below for a step-by-step tutorial on the dirty pour flip cup technique:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Husky Plastic Sheeting (or a large garbage bag / old newspapers / a bunch of plastic grocery bags / a painter’s dropcloth)

Foil Cookie Tray (to catch most of the excess paint as it runs off the edges of the painting – I purchased a set of 2 for $1.00 at the dollar store)

Vinyl Gloves (if you don’t want to be cleaning acrylic paint from under your fingernails for days, then use gloves – I buy mine by the box at Walmart in the cleaning supplies aisle)

Acrylic Craft Paints (in the video, I used Martha Stewart Wedding Cake & Beach Glass, Folk Art Aqua, Ceramcoat Black, and Decoart Champagne Gold craft paints)

Pouring Medium (I make mine with a 1:1 ratio of Elmer’s Glue All and water)

Squeeze Bottle (I put the glue and water into this and shake it up until they’re well mixed. The squeeze bottles are a really easy way to dispense your pouring medium, and you can just put the cap back on when you’re not using so it doesn’t dry out)

Food Service Portion Cups (to hold the paint / pouring medium mixture – you can use any small plastic cups for this, or you can save yogurt containers or even plastic cat food containers and use those)

Wood Craft Sticks (to stir the paint / pouring medium mixture – I picked up a package of 100 for $1.00 at the dollar store, and once the paint is completely dry on them, you can reuse them)

Art Alternatives 8×10 Canvas Panels (if you want to hang your paintings on the wall, you should use a regular canvas, but I like these panels and buy them by the dozen from Amazon)

Plastic Shot Glasses (to raise the canvas off of the work surface so the paint can flow off the edges after you pour – I bought a package of 24 plastic shot glasses for $1.00 at the dollar store, but you can use food service containers, plastic yogurt containers, cat food containers, or even a small box under the canvas)

Happy pouring!

Silhouette Mint Stamps + Versamark Reinker for Heat Embossing (Video)

Silhouette Mint Stamps + Versamark Reinker for Heat Embossing (One More Round)

I’ve already gone a couple of rounds with Silhouette Mint stamps and Versamark Watermark Ink for heat embossing and, to this point, the results have not been great. I’m giving one more round with the Versamark Reinker, and I’m using a tip that I picked up from viewer Mary, who said that she uses a baby wipe to wipe excess ink from the entire stamp before stamping with it. She’s been getting great results with this method and the Silhouette Mint brand ink, so I thought I’d give it a shot with the Versamark ink.

I also wanted to see whether the type of image that you use for the stamp makes any difference in the results, so I made one stamp with a more complex image (a monogram from my Classic Monogram Wreaths font) and one a simple image with a lot of solid areas (I used a letter from the Chunk Five font – it’s a free download).

Unfortunately, even after generous use of a powder tool, I was not able to get consistently crisp and clean heat embossed images with either stamp. There was always some excess embossing powder that stuck in the areas around the stamped image. With the more simple image stamp, you can much more easily come in with small, dry paintbrush and remove some of that excess embossing powder. But, for me, the quality of the results just wasn’t worth the effort that it took to get there.

The results aren’t bad, per se, but they’re not as good as I’d like them to be, especially since you’ll need to stamp out at least a dozen or more impressions just to get to the point where the heat embossed images look decent. I don’t want to be a Debbie Downer but, unfortunately, Versamark doesn’t seem to be an ink that plays well with Mint stamps. I’ve gotten better results using Silhouette Mint brand colored inks for heat embossing. They’re not perfect, but they’re not too bad.

NOTE : In person, the amount of excess embossing powder left around the stamps is more pronounced. I turned down the brightness in parts of the video so you can see it better, but it’s still hard to see just what it looks like in person.

Check out the video below to see how I set up the stamps in Mint Studio, as well as the testing and results with the Versamark reinker:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

– Classic Wreath Monograms Dingbat Font
ChunkFive Font
Silhouette Mint Studio Software

Silhouette Mint Supplies

Silhouette Mint Custom Stamp Maker
Silhouette Mint Stamp Kits (with the stamp base / block)
Silhouette Mint Stamp Sheet Sets (just stamp sheets)
Silhouette Mint Inks

For Heat Embossing

Versamark Reinker
Neenah Solar White Cardstock (80lb.)
EK Tools Powder Tool
Ranger Embossing Powder, Liquid Platinum
Darice Multi-Purpose Heat Tool
– baby wipes
– paper towels

How to Store Silhouette Mint Stamps Unmounted / Foam Mounted (Video)

How to Store Silhouette Mint Stamps Unmounted / Foam Mounted

After my recent video about how to use Silhouette Mint stamps with a stamp platform, a couple of you asked me how I store the stamps since they’re not mounted in the same way as you would mount them if you were using them with the Silhouette Mint stamp mounts. This is a great question, and it’s one that I actually hadn’t thought about when I first posted the video. But the great news is that there’s a quick and easy way to store the unmounted or EZ Foam mounted stamps without having to buy something special to store them in.

If you’re using something like the EZ Mount Static Cling Mounting Foam to mount the stamps on the stamp platform, you won’t be able to close the lid on the Silhouette Mint stamp mount if you pop the mounted stamp directly into it because the mounted stamp + thin piece of adhesive foam that comes on the Silhouette Mint stamp mounts will be too thick for you to be able to snap the lid on. So, in order to store the stamps, you’ll just need to remove the thin piece of adhesive foam that is on the Silhouette Mint stamp mounts. Once you get going, you can get it off pretty quickly. It didn’t come off neatly in one piece, but it wasn’t too difficult to get off.

You can see in the video below that I didn’t do a very meticulous job of getting that foam off, but you don’t need to get every little bit off in order for this to work. Just make sure that you remove the thick pieces of the foam – if there’s a little bit of adhesive with a very thin coating of the foam still on there, it’s not a big deal. After that, you can pop the stamp into the mount and press the lid on. It won’t click on quite as tightly as it normally would, but the lid will still be on their tightly enough that you won’t have to worry about it coming off when you store the mount or move it around. In addition, because the EZ Mount Foam is thicker than the foam that comes on the Mint stamp mounts, the stamp will be pressed right up against the lid and will leave an inked impression. But that’s doesn’t seem to affect anything, so no worries.

Check out the video below to see how to store unmounted / foam mounted Silhouette Mint Stamps:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Silhouette Mint Custom Stamp Maker
Silhouette Mint Stamp Kits (with the stamp base / block)
Silhouette Mint Stamp Sheet Sets (just stamp sheets)
Tonic Studios Tim Holtz Stamp Platform
EZ Mount Static Cling Mounting Foam

How to Use Silhouette Mint Stamps with a Stamp Platform (Alternate Method – Video)

How to Use Silhouette Mint Stamps with a Stamp Platform (Alternate Method)

A little while back, I shared my method for using Silhouette Mint stamps with a stamp platform, and the results were great! In the video below, I’ll show you an alternate way of using the Silhouette Mint stamps with a stamp platform, this time by raising the surface that you’ll be stamping on instead of making the stamp sheet thicker with something like the EZ Mount Static Cling Mounting foam that I used in my earlier video. This method uses a mousepad, which is something that most of us already have around, so you won’t need to purchase any new supplies to make the Mint stamps work with a platform if you already have a plain, flat mousepad.

The results with the mousepad were pretty darn good but, if you’re using a stamp platform like the Tonic Studios Tim Holtz Stamp Platform that I use, you won’t be able to use the magnets that come with it if you want the mousepad method to give good results. Because we’re raising the stamping surface, the magnets create a gap between the lid of the platform and the stamping surface, so stamped impressions will be uneven and lighter in the areas where the magnet are.

If you still want to be able to hold your cardstock or whatever you’re stamping on in place, you can always use some removable double-sided tape on the back of your cardstock to hold it temporarily in place while you’re stamping so it doesn’t have a chance to shift around at all.

Check out the video below to see the process and results:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Silhouette Mint Custom Stamp Maker
Silhouette Mint Stamp Kits (with the stamp base / block)
Silhouette Mint Stamp Sheet Sets (just stamp sheets)
Tonic Studios Tim Holtz Stamp Platform
Silhouette Mint Black Ink
Scotch Removable Double-Sided Tape
a mousepad (similar to the one at the link)
printer paper
paper towels

Classic Wreath Monograms Dingbat Font + Vinyl Test Cutting

 

Classic Wreath Monograms Dingbat Font from k.becca #font

I just released the Classic Wreath Monograms dingbat font, and I’m really excited about it because 1) it’s my very first natively designed dingbat font, and 2) it’s a super versatile font that will help you easily add elegant monograms to everything from art prints to pillows to vinyl craft projects.

Dingbat fonts are awesome because they can be used just as you would use a regular font but, instead of alpabetic and numeric characters, they contain cool stuff like symbols, illlustrations and, in this case, wreath monograms.

In this font, the lowercase letters are mapped to the leaf outline versions of the wreaths, and the uppercase letters are mapped to the filled leaf versions of the wreaths. If you’re cutting these monograms from vinyl using a die cutting machine (I use a Silhouette Cameo), I recommend a minimum font size of 150pts for the leaf outline wreaths and a minimum font size of 72pts for the filled leaf wreaths. If you’re cutting from paper, be sure to go with larger minium sizes than this. And, if you’re printing the monograms rather than cutting them, you have more flexibility with the minimum point size.

DIY Holographic Vinyl Monogram Wreath Notebook from k.becca

In the video below, I’ll show you how well the Classic Wreath Monograms font performs when cut from two different brands of vinyl : Oracal 651, Metallic Gold and Cricut Holographic Opal vinyls. We’ll make a super quick and easy monogram notebook, too!

Check out the video for a look at the Classic Wreath Monograms font and the vinyl test cutting results (and keep scrolling to see a preview of all of the images in the font):
Check out the video below to see the process and results:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Classic Wreath Monograms Dingbat Font
Silhouette Studio (Designer Edition)
Silhouette Cameo
Silhouette Hook Tool (for weeding)
Silhouette Scraper Tool (for burnishing)
Oracal 651 Vinyl, Metallic Gold
Cricut Vinyl, Holographic Opal
Best Crafts Transfer Tape / Transfer Paper
– a small notebook with a blank cover

 

Classic Wreath Monograms Dingbat Font from k.becca #font

Arteza Watercolors Review (Set of 24)

Arteza Watercolors Review (Set of 24)

Arteza recently sent me a set of their watercolors to test out and review. To be honest, I’m nowhere near being a pro when it comes to watercolors, but I did enjoy using this set and think that it’s a good quality set of tube watercolors for the beginner or even the intermediate level watercolorist.

Arteza Watercolor Tube (Detail)

I have the set of 24 (Arteza also offers a set of 12), and I think that the set has a really nice range of colors. I especially like the color selection in the yellows and reds. If I’m being picky, the one thing I would’ve liked to see in this set is a little more variety in the blue hues, something darker like an indigo or a blue-green like a veridian hue. But overall I think this is a nice set of watercolors. They’re creamy and easy to work with, and it’s a great little extra that each tube shows a lightfastness rating, opacity indicator, and lists pigments included in that color. You don’t see this too often on lower priced watercolors, so it was a pleasant surprise.

Some colors in the set, like Yellow Ochre and Noir (black), are more opaque than others, and I think that the opacity indicators on each tube are pretty accurate. Also, I did notice a bit of granulation in certain colors. Granulation is neither a good nor a bad thing. Some watercolorists love the texture that it adds, while others aren’t so keen on it. So, it’s a matter of personal preference, and I wanted to mention it.

SAVE 10% ON YOUR ORDER FROM ARTEZA WITH CODE : ANZ-QLA-961

Check out the video below to see my review:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

SAVE 10% ON YOUR ORDER FROM ARTEZA WITH CODE : ANZ-QLA-961

Arteza Watercolors Tubes (Set of 24)
Canson XL Watercolor Paper
Royal & Langnickel Disposable Palette Paper

Here’s a color swatch chart of the set:

Arteza Watercolors Swatch Chart (Set of 24)

 

How to Access Extended Font Characters in Silhouette Mint Studio (Video)

How to Access Extended Font Characters in Silhouette Mint Studio

Over the past few years, SO MANY beautiful fonts have been released, and many of them included extended characters. These can include multiple variations of characters – for example, two different lowercase “a’s” and/or two different uppercase “S’s” – as well as character variations with beautiful flourished endings and special glyphs for non-English alphabets. Extended characters can also include ligatures, which are two or more letters that are designed as a single glyph for better visual appeal. Each of these types of extended characters adds visual appeal and a more hand lettered, custom look to your finished design. So, of course we want to be able to access these options when we’re making our Silhouette Mint stamps, right?

In the video below, I’ll take you through the process of accessing extended font characters in Silhouette Mint Studio on a Windows PC using the Character Map. If you’re on a Mac, you can use an app called Font Book to accomplish the same thing. The font that I use in the video is called So Fontsy, and as of the date of this post, you can download it for FREE exclusively over on the SoFontsy site.

If you go through the step-by-step process shown in the video and see a bunch of blank areas where the extended characters should be, then you may very well be dealing with a non-PUA encoded font. PUA stands for “private use areas” and PUA encoded fonts allow you to access any special or extended characters included in a font in programs such as Silhouette Studio, Cricut Design Space, and Mint Studio. If you’re using a font that is not PUA encoded, you won’t be able to access these characters and the character map will be blank like this one is. So, if you’re going to use a font in Silhouette Studio, Cricut Design Space, Mint Studio, or similar programs, be sure to make sure that it’s PUA encoded before you purchase it. On sites like SoFontsy this information will often be included in the font description, but on sites like Creative Market that don’t cater specifically to crafters, it may not be, and you’ll need to contact the seller to double-check.

If you’re using the fonts in programs like Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop, extended characters will still be accessible even if a font is not PUA encoded since you can access extended characters via built-in menu options in these programs.

Check out the video to learn how to access extended font characters in Silhouette Mint Studio:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

So Fontsy Font (FREE download)
Silhouette Mint Studio Software

Silhouette Mint Supplies

Silhouette Mint Custom Stamp Maker
Silhouette Mint Stamp Kits (with the stamp base / block)
Silhouette Mint Stamp Sheet Sets (just stamp sheets)

Minc Reactive Mist Alternative

Minc Reactive Mist Alternative Video

I’ve noticed that it’s been getting more difficult to find the Minc Reactive Mist. It’s a versatile reactive medium for diy hot foil projects, so it’s a bummer if it’s in the process of being discontinued (I’m not sure whether it is or not).

In this video, I’m testing out the E6000 Spray Adhesive as a possible alternative to the Minc Reactive Mist. It’s a liquid adhesive, and it has a spray nozzle, so there are definite similarities. In the video below, I test it as a spray and paint with it to see how it performs when foiled, and I have to say that I actually like it BETTER than the Minc Reactive mist. The E6000 definitely outperforms the Reactive Mist when it comes to spray action. I never really have been able to get a consistently decent spray from the Reactive Mist. When it comes to painting, the two are about even, with the Reactive Mist coming in just above the E6000. The mist has a thicker consistency, which is why I think it performed just a bit better for foiling, but you can always paint on multiple coats of the E6000 for more coverage and better results.

Check out the video to see all of the test results:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″
E6000 Spray Adhesive
Minc Reactive Foil, Rose Gold
Deco Foil Transfer Sheets, Rose Gold
Deco Foil Transfer Sheets, Opal
Hammermill Color Copy Digital Cover 80lb. Paper
Strathmore Bristol Smooth Paper
an old / inexpensive paintbrush – I like this set from Crayola because it’s inexpensive and includes 5 different size brushes
a container with water (to soak the paintbrush after use)
plain printer paper (to use as a carrier sheet)
a cardboard box (to protect your work surface when you spray the adhesive)

My Favorite Tip for Adding Sequins to Cards (Video)

My Favorite Tip for Adding Sequins to Cards // Pretty Pink Posh Sparkle Dot Patterns 1 Stamp Set

I was lucky enough to be able to design the really cool and innovative Sparkle Dot Patterns 1 stamp set with Pretty Pink Posh, and this set is really taking my sequin game to the next level. To be honest, though, sequins have always been kind of a tricky thing for me. I have really unsteady hands, and when I’d add sequins to a card using any type of liquid glue, I’d usually end up accidentally bumping or nudging sequins out of place as I was working. But I recently found a product that’s been a total game changer for me : Micro Glue Dots! I love these teeny weeny glue dots, which fit perfectly inside the circles on the Sparkle Dot Pattern stamps. They provide an instant, strong bond, so once you adhere a sequin, it’s not going anywhere easily.

Since I started using glue dots to add sequins to cards, my shaky hands and I no longer have to worry about accidentally bumping or nudging sequins out of place, and I can add sequins a lot more quickly, too. For example, the star in the card above took me about half the time to make as it did when I used liquid glue.

Check out the video below to see my favorite sequin tip in action:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Pretty Pink Posh Sparkle Dot Patterns 1 Stamp Set
Pretty Pink Posh Everyday Greetings Stamp Set
Pretty Pink Posh Wildflowers 4mm Sequin Mix
Tonic Studios Tim Holtz Stamp Platform
Pumice Stone Distress Ink (any light, neutral ink will work)
EK Tools Powder Tool
Versamark Watermark Ink
Darice Embossing Heat Tool
Martha Stewart Antique Gold Embossing Powder (I think this has been discontinued, but any gold embossing powder will work)
Glue Dots Micro Dots (3mm)
EK Tools Craft Tweezers
My Favorite Things Primitive Cream Card Stock

Silhouette Studio Tutorial : How to Make Layered Stencils (Video)

Silhouette Studio Tutorial : How to Make Layered Stencils (Video)

I love making stencils with my Silhouette Cameo, and in the video below I’ll show you how easy it is to design layered stencils from a single layer cut file in Silhouette Studio 4.1. It’s just as easy to created a stencil with 10 layers as it is to create one with 2 layers. A registration mark or marks are the key, and they allow you to perfectly line up each layer to create stenciled designs that can be as simple or complex as your heart desires.

After we create our layered stencil, we’ll use it to make the pretty, stenciled background for the card above. One of the big bonuses of cutting your own stencils is that you sometimes end up with a bunch of super pretty die cuts that you can use as embellishments for projects. I used a few of the leaves from the leaf layer of the stencil to embellish around the sentiment on this card.

Watch the Silhouette Studio tutorial below, and learn how easy it is to make layered stencils for card making and other projects:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Leaves & Berries Stencil Cut Files

Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool
Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition
Grafix Matte Dura-Lar .005

For the Card

Milled Lavender Distress Ink Pad Mini
Seedless Preserves Distress Ink Pad Mini
Ranger Archival Ink, Jet Black
foam daubers (similar to what I used)
Pretty Pink Posh Thoughtful Greetings Stamp Set
Post-it Tape, 1 Inch
Scotch Removable Double Sided Tape
Scotch Foam Mounting Tape, 1/2 Inch
painter’s tape
a non-stick craft mat

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