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Acrylic Pouring for Beginners, Making Cells with Silicone & Isopropyl Alcohol (Video)

Acrylic Pouring for Beginners, Cells with Silicone & Isopropyl Alcohol #acrylicpouring

Until now, I haven’t used any silicone additives in my acrylic pour paintings, so they’ve had more of a marbled look (which I love) and only have small cells, if any. Cells are one of the trademarks of acrylic pour paintings, and they add some seriously cool texture and variation (which I also love). In the video below, I’ll give you a step-by-step tutorial on how to use silicone oil plus isopropyl alcohol to create cells in your pour paintings.

My silicone oil is a treadmill belt lubricant that’s popular for using in acrylic pouring. It’s not too expensive, and it’s 100% silicone, which is what you want for pour paintings because additional ingredients can affect your results. This could be a good thing, but it could also be a not so good thing. I’ve seen people use everything from coconut oil to WD-4o (be sure to use the silicone-based WD-40) to create cells, so you’ve got a lot of options.

I used 4 drops of silicone oil per paint color (I didn’t used silicone oil in the white paint), and at first the cells were very subtle. But after I gave the painting a few spritzes of 91% isopropyl alcohol, the cells grew almost instantly. From there, I tipped the canvas panel around a little bit more to make the cells a bit larger, and the tilting also caused the cells to reshape themselves into more organic shapes, which I loved.

I’m really happy with this first attempt at creating cells, and I have so many more things that I want to try, like changing the amount of silicone oil that I use, adding the oil to all of the paints, seeing what happens if I don’t spray the painting with alcohol, etc. Acrylic pouring really does offer endless possibilities, and it’s always exciting to see how the next painting will flow!

Check out the video below to see how to create cells in acrylic pour paintings using silicone oil and isopropyl alcohol:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Husky Plastic Sheeting (or a large garbage bag / old newspapers / a bunch of plastic grocery bags / a painter’s dropcloth)

Foil Cookie Tray (to catch most of the excess paint as it runs off the edges of the painting – I purchased a set of 2 for $1.00 at the dollar store)

Vinyl Gloves (if you don’t want to be cleaning acrylic paint from under your fingernails for days, then use gloves – I buy mine by the box at Walmart in the cleaning supplies aisle)

Acrylic Craft Paints (in the video, I used Martha Stewart Wedding Cake & Beach Glass and Ceramcoat Black craft paints)

Pouring Medium (I make mine with a 1:1 ratio of Elmer’s Glue All and water)

Squeeze Bottle (I put the glue and water into this and shake it up until they’re well mixed. The squeeze bottles are a really easy way to dispense your pouring medium, and you can just put the cap back on when you’re not using so it doesn’t dry out)

Food Service Portion Cups (to hold the paint / pouring medium mixture – you can use any small plastic cups for this, or you can save yogurt containers or even plastic cat food containers and use those)

Wood Craft Sticks (to stir the paint / pouring medium mixture – I picked up a package of 100 for $1.00 at the dollar store, and once the paint is completely dry on them, you can reuse them)

Art Alternatives 8×10 Canvas Panels (if you want to hang your paintings on the wall, you should use a regular canvas, but I like these panels and buy them by the dozen from Amazon)

Plastic Shot Glasses (to raise the canvas off of the work surface so the paint can flow off the edges after you pour – I bought a package of 24 plastic shot glasses for $1.00 at the dollar store, but you can use food service containers, plastic yogurt containers, cat food containers, or even a small box under the canvas)

91% Isopropyl Rubbing Alcohol in a spritzer bottle to pop bubbles in the paint. You can spray this into the paint cups before pouring, spritz it onto the canvas after pouring, or both. Alcohol also helps to open up the cells in paintings when you’re using silicone oil.

Spot On 100% Silicone Treadmill Belt Lubricant to create cells in acrylic pour paintings. Combine with Isopropyl Alcohol for more pronounced cells.

Happy pouring!

Video : Using a Paintbrush with Heidi Swapp Minc Reactive Mist

Using a Paintbrush with the Heidi Swapp Minc Reactive Mist (Video)

After I posted my testing and review of the Heidi Swapp Minc Reactive Paint and Reactive Mist, a few of you asked whether you can use a paintbrush with the Reactive Mist just like you can with the Reactive Paint. The answer is a big ol’ yes!

Both the Reactive Mist and Reactive Paint offer a number of options and possibilities for those of you who don’t have a laser printer but would like to add foil accents and details to your projects. In the video below, I’ll explore just a couple of ways that you can use a paintbrush with the Reactive Mist to create custom patterns and elements that you can then foil with the Minc.

NOTES : Two of the biggest things to remember when you’re painting with the Minc Reactive Mist are 1) hold onto the bottle (if you can remember) when you dip your brush into it, or you may end up with a mess on your hands (and work surface) and 2) make sure that the Reactive Mist (or Reactive Paint, if that’s what you’re using) is COMPLETELY dry before running your pieces through the Minc. I use a folded piece of printer paper as a transfer folder for projects where I use the Mist or Paint, just in case, because any area that’s still wet can be pushed outward (and onto your transfer folder) as the piece is being run through the Minc. If this happens and it’s only a small area, then it’s usually not a big deal but, if it’s a larger area, then your transfer folder could be ruined.

Check out the video below to see some of the things that you can do when you use a paintbrush with the Minc Reactive Mist:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Hand Lettered Love Die Cut

Heidi Swapp Minc Light Pink Reactive Foil ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Matte Champagne Reactive Foil ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Liquid Toner Reactive Mist ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 12″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Heidi Swapp Minc Foil Applicator 6″ ( AMZ // SBK )
Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK ) – if you’re making a custom die cut for the card
Hammermill Color Copy Digital Cover 80lb. cardstock
an old / inexpensive paintbrush – I like this set from Crayola because it’s inexpensive and includes 5 different size brushes
a small container with water (to soak the paintbrush after use)
plain printer paper
Tombow Mono Multi Liquid Glue
a double-sided adhesive runner
3L Foam Adhesive Squares
craft scissors

Video : Quick & Easy Heat Embossed Halloween Tags

Quick & Easy Heat Embossed Halloween Tags

These quick and easy Halloween tags are just the thing if you find yourself in need of some last minute treat bag or party favor embellishments for the spookiest holiday of the year! All you’ll need to make a big stack of these are blank gift tags and some basic heat embossing supplies.

Tips : A powder tool really comes in handy for heat embossing projects, especially if you’re embossing on darker paper, as is the case with this project. The powder helps minimize static electricity and helps prevent excess embossing powder from sticking to your paper or cardstock, so you’ll get a much cleaner final embossed image. In addition, you can use a small, dry paintbrush to loosen and remove any additional excess powder before heat embossing.

Check out the video below to see the entire tag making process:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Tag Basics, Set 1 Die Cuts (any blank tags will work)

Silhouette Cameo ( AMZ // SBK ) – or any digital die cutting machine that works with SVG, DXF, or GSD files
Tsukineko Dual-Ended VersaMarker Pen ( AMZ // SSS )
EK Tools Powder Tool
Darice Multi-Purpose Heat Tool
embossing powder (I used Stampendous Detail White, Zing! Cricket, and Martha Stewart Silver embossing powders)
a pencil and eraser
black cardstock (if you are cutting the tags by hand or with a die cutting machine)
a small, dry paintbrush (optional – see Tips above)

Video : Does Silhouette Mint Ink Work with Watercolors?

Does Silhouette Mint Ink Work with Watercolors?

Wondering whether Silhouette Mint ink works with watercolors? I was, too, so I tested out several types of watercolor mediums with the black Silhouette Mint ink, which is the ink color that I use most.

Here’s a little hint about whether the Mint ink is water resistant : yes, it is! And this means that we have so, so many more creative options with our custom Silhouette Mint stamps. If you don’t have a Mint and are curious about what it does, then be sure to check out the video in this post, where you’ll see a step-by-step for designing and creating your first custom stamp with the Silhouette Mint.

Check out the video below to see the types of watercolor mediums that I tested, as well as my results with each:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

AMZ = Amazon.com     SBK = Scrapbook.com     DKB = Dick Blick     SSS = Simon Says Stamp

Silhouette Mint Custom Stamp Maker Kit ( AMZ / SBK )
Strathmore Bristol Vellum Paper ( AMZ // DKB )

Watercolor Mediums Tested

Sakura Koi Watercolors
Kuretake Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pens
Distress Markers (you should have the same or very similar results with Distress Inkpads, too)
Derwent Inktense Pencils
Faber Castell Albrecht Durer Watercolor Pencils

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