Archive | Tutorials

Acrylic Pouring for Beginners : American Crafts Color Pour Paints

Acrylic Pouring for Beginners : American Crafts Color Pour Paints #acrylicpouring #pourpainting

I’ve been curious about the American Crafts Color Pour paints for a while now, and in this week’s Acrylic Pouring for Beginners video, I finally got to test them out!

The Color Pour line includes several different, pre-mixed pouring paint kits, including the Galaxy Surge kit that I used in the video. It also includes a wide range of individual colors. The pouring paint kits include 4 oz. bottles of 4 different paint colors, and the great thing about the Color Pour paints is that they come pre-mixed with pouring medium, so they’re ready for pouring right out of the bottle. The paints are more pricey than using regular craft paints with a DIY pouring medium like the Elmer’s Glue All and water medium that I’ve been using for many of my paintings, but they’re a very good choice if you’re looking for convenience.

A couple of notes about the Color Pour paints : I noticed that the paints have a stronger smell than any of the other paints that I’ve used for pouring. It’s not overpowering or anything like that, but it’s something to keep in mind if you’re sensitive to smells. Also, when the paints dry, they have a more plastic-like look than the other acrylic paints that I’ve used. They seemed to fill in and smooth out the texture on the canvas more than regular craft paints. This isn’t really good OR bad. It’s more a matter of your personal preference and how you like your paint to look on the canvas.

Acrylic Pouring for Beginners : American Crafts Color Pour Paints #acrylicpouring #pourpainting

As you can see above, I had two very different results with the paintings I made with the Color Pour paints. The painting on the left has more subtle color variations with large areas of solid color, while the painting on the right (I added silicone oil to the paint for this one to help create cells) has a more “classic” acrylic pour look, with lots of color variation and cells here and there.

Check out the video below for the step-by-step pouring process for both of the Color Pour paintings:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Husky Plastic Sheeting (or a large garbage bag / old newspapers / a bunch of plastic grocery bags / a painter’s dropcloth)

Foil Cookie Trays (to catch most of the excess paint as it runs off the edges of the painting – I purchased a set of 2 for $1.00 at the dollar store)

Vinyl / Nitrile Gloves (if you don’t want to be cleaning acrylic paint from under your fingernails for days, then use gloves – I buy mine by the box at Walmart in the cleaning supplies aisle)

American Crafts Galaxy Surge Pouring Paint Kit

Plastic Cups (to hold the paint / pouring medium mixture – you can use any small plastic cups for this, or you can save yogurt containers or even plastic cat food containers and use those)

Wood Craft Sticks (to stir the paint / pouring medium mixture – I picked up a package of 100 for $1.00 at the dollar store, and once the paint is completely dry on them, you can reuse them)

Artist’s Loft Brand 12 x 12 Inch Canvas (Michael’s brand)

Plastic Shot Glasses (to raise the canvas off of the work surface so the paint can flow off the edges after you pour – I bought a package of 24 plastic shot glasses for $1.00 at the dollar store, but you can use food service containers, plastic yogurt containers, cat food containers, or even a small box under the canvas)

Spot On 100% Silicone Treadmill Belt Lubricant to create cells in acrylic pour paintings. I used about 20 drops / 1/8 teaspoon to about 3 Tablespoons of the Floetrol/paint mixture.

Silhouette Sketch + Watercolor : Quick & Easy Cardmaking Idea (Video)

Silhouette Sketch + Watercolor : Quick & Easy Cardmaking Idea (Video) #silhouettecameo #cardmaking

I’ve really been getting into sketching with my Silhouette Cameo lately, and in this week’s video I combine sketch designs with watercolor for this quick & easy watercolor wreath card. A project like this is really just the beginning when it comes to all of the different creative options that you have when you combine Silhouette’s sketch function with watercoloring. I’ll definitely be exploring this more in the coming months!

The main things to keep in mind when you’re watercoloring sketch designs are 1) use a watercolor-friendly paper. I used one of my favorites, the Strathmore Bristol Smooth paper. And 2) make sure that whatever pen / marker / pencil you use is water resistant or waterproof. I’ve been using Sharpie Precision Ultra Fine Point Markers, and they work beautifully with watercolor but, as I mention in the video, some of the other Sharpie markers that I have aren’t water resistant and will bleed and smear when used with a water-based medium.

My watercoloring style tends to be very loose, so my intention was to go outside the lines, but if you’re into a neater look, then you can certainly do that for a project like this, too.

I used the Prima Decadent Pies Watercolor set for my card, and the paint numbers for the color mixes that I used are: 26 & 28 // 26 & 35 // 33 & 36 // 35

Check out the video below for a step-by-step tutorial on how to create this quick and easy sketch + watercolor wreath card:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Laurel Wreath Sketch Files

Handwritten Hello Sketch Phrases

Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool

Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition

Nicapa Cutting Mats for the Silhouette Cameo

Strathmore Bristol Smooth Paper

Sharpie Precision Permanent Markers, Ultra Fine Point (Set of 24)

Prima Watercolor Confections, Decadent Pies

Scotch Foam Mounting Tape

Neenah Solar White 80lb. Cardstock (for the A2 card base)

Nuvo White Blizzard Glitter Drops

Chomas Creations Silhouette Marker Holder

– a wood popsicle / craft stick

– a #5 round brush

– paper towels

– a jar of water

 

Silhouette Sketch + Watercolor : Quick & Easy Cardmaking Idea (Video) #silhouettecameo #cardmaking

Acrylic Pouring for Beginners : My First Stretched Canvas Pour with Floetrol + Silicone Oil (Video)

Acrylic Pouring for Beginners : My First Stretched Canvas Pour with Floetrol + Silicone Oil #acrylicpouring #pourpainting

Up until now, I’ve only used canvas panels for acrylic pouring, but I thought it was time that I graduated to stretched canvas. In this video, I’ll show you how it turned out and the things about pouring on stretched canvas that were a little bit of a change from what I’ve been used to with the canvas panels.

My main concern was mixing enough paint / Floetrol to cover the entire canvas since it was a larger surface than I’m used working with. I ended up deciding to do a double flip cup technique at the last minute, instead of using just one cup, to make sure that I had enough paint. I actually ended up with more than enough paint to cover the canvas, so yay to that!

Check out the video below to see the step-by-step process for making my first stretched canvas acrylic pour painting:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Husky Plastic Sheeting (or a large garbage bag / old newspapers / a bunch of plastic grocery bags / a painter’s dropcloth)

Foil Cookie Trays (to catch most of the excess paint as it runs off the edges of the painting – I purchased a set of 2 for $1.00 at the dollar store)

Vinyl / Nitrile Gloves (if you don’t want to be cleaning acrylic paint from under your fingernails for days, then use gloves – I buy mine by the box at Walmart in the cleaning supplies aisle)

Acrylic Craft Paints (in the video, I used DecoArt Crafters Acrylic White + Craft Smart Vanilla (for the off white), Americana Ultramarine Blue + Apple Barrel Wild Iris + a little bit of Americana Carousel Pink and Delta Ceramcoat Black (for the purple-y blue), and Americana Saffron Yellow + Apple Barrel Wild Iris (for the mustard yellow))

Floetrol (I used a ratio of 1:1 Floetrol to paint, but if you have a thicker paint, you might want to go to 60/40 Floetrol to paint or add a little bit of water to thin things out to a good consistency)

Plastic Cups (to hold the paint / pouring medium mixture – you can use any small plastic cups for this, or you can save yogurt containers or even plastic cat food containers and use those)

Wood Craft Sticks (to stir the paint / pouring medium mixture – I picked up a package of 100 for $1.00 at the dollar store, and once the paint is completely dry on them, you can reuse them)

Artist’s Loft Brand 12 x 12 Inch Canvas (Michael’s brand)

Plastic Shot Glasses (to raise the canvas off of the work surface so the paint can flow off the edges after you pour – I bought a package of 24 plastic shot glasses for $1.00 at the dollar store, but you can use food service containers, plastic yogurt containers, cat food containers, or even a small box under the canvas)

Spot On 100% Silicone Treadmill Belt Lubricant to create cells in acrylic pour paintings. I used about 20 drops / 1/8 teaspoon to about 3 Tablespoons of the Floetrol/paint mixture.

DIY Domed Stickers with the Silhouette Doming Starter Kit (Video Tutorial)

DIY Domed Stickers with the Silhouette Doming Starter Kit (Video Tutorial) #silhouettecameo

We’re taking stickers to the next level in today’s video tutorial! I’ll show you how to make custom DIY domed stickers with the Silhouette Doming Starter Kit, which includes everything you’ll need to make domed stickers like the little lemon above. Doming involves using a two part epoxy resin to add a clear, dimensional area to the stickers, and the final look is really special … and super cool, too.

To learn how to make the sticker sheets that I use to make the domed stickers, check out my tutorial on How to Make Kiss Cut Sticker Sheets in Silhouette Studio.

This was actually my third time making domed stickers with the kit, and during my first two “test” runs (in other words, I really messed things up), I learned some tips that I hope will help you get great results on your first try.

Tips for getting the best domed sticker results:

  • The clear sticker paper and doming laminate sheets are not interchangeable, which I thought might be the case at first. The sticker sheets are much thicker, and when added over the white sticker paper (you only need the doming sheets if you’re using the white sticker paper) the two layers are tough to cut cleanly through with a Silhouette machine. Also, the clear sticker paper creates a sort of textured look over the white sticker paper. It’s not necessarily bad, but I prefer the much smoother look of the doming laminate sheets.
  • If you need to set the filled epoxy syringe down at any point while you’re working, be sure to keep the syringe tip elevated or resin will start to run out of the syringe onto your work surface. I set the syringe down on top of one of the bottles of epoxy with the tip up, and this prevents any resin from leaking out of the syringe.
  • Part A of the epoxy resin (the base) is much thicker than Part B, so be sure to actively push down on the syringe plunger while you’re adding the epoxy to the stickers. Otherwise, what runs out will be mostly Part B of the epoxy since it has a much thinner consistency than Part A and the epoxy won’t cure or set up.
  • A heat tool can be used to pop any bubbles in the epoxy, but it can also blow some epoxy off the edges of the stickers, so be careful to add epoxy further from the edges on stickers if you’re planning on using a heat tool. If any epoxy runs off the edges of the stickers, it will soak into the sticker sheet backer paper and look somewhat like a grease stain. It doesn’t affect the stickers, but it doesn’t look great.
  • The instructions in the Doming Starter Kit say to allow the epoxy to cure for 12 hours, but I’ve found that it can take up to 24 hours for it to fully cure sometimes. So, the curing time seems like it may be dependent on things like the temperature and humidity in the environment where the stickers are curing.
  • To store the epoxy syringe when you’re finished with your stickers, hold it (plunger side down), pull the plunger out a bit to get some air space between the epoxy and the tip end of the syringe, remove the syringe tip (use a paper towel to wipe off any epoxy resin that bubbles out of the tip), and place the pink cap back onto the tip and twist to lock it closed. I’ve been storing the epoxy syringe plunger side down like this, and there’s no sign of crystallization after about a week (at the time that I made this video).

Check out the video below for a step-by-step tutorial on making your own diy domed stickers with the Silhouette Doming Starter Kit:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Fun in the Sun Elements / Stickers

Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool

Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition

Canon iX6520 Inkjet Printer

Silhouette Doming Starter Kit

Silhouette Scraper Tool (an old credit card/gift card will work, too)

Fiskars Personal Paper Trimmer (optional)

– paper towels

Also mentioned in the video :

Silhouette Epoxy Resin Set

Silhouette Doming Laminate Sheets

 

DIY Domed Stickers with the Silhouette Doming Starter Kit (Video Tutorial) #silhouettecameo

 

 

Testing Cheap Gel Pens as Sketch Pens for Silhouette Cameo (Video)

Smart Color Art Gel Pens Review / Sketch Pens for Silhouette Cameo #silhouettecameo

I’ve been using the sketch feature on my Silhouette Cameo machine much more often recently and have been building my stash of gel pens as a result. In today’s video, I’m testing out a set of cheap gel pens from Smart Color Art to see how well they work as sketch pens.

Overall, I was happy with how the pens performed. When I was swatching them out, there were a few pens that were dry and scratchy, but the set comes with refills for all of the pens, so I’m hoping the refills will work better.

My biggest disappointment was that the pens weren’t as opaque as I thought they would be. The metallic pens are the most opaque on dark cardstock, but the milky pastels were kind of streaky and not as opaque as I expected. Also, while the glitter pens have a nice, subtle glitter payoff, the inks aren’t opaque at all, so only the glitter and a hint of color shows up on dark cardstock.

At the under $20 price point, I’d defintely purchase this set again. I really like the range of colors, and they work well on white cardstock. The pens that I tested also performed very well as sketch pens, much better than I expected. However, if you tend to use black or darker colored cardstock for sketch, I don’t think I’d recommend this particular set because, except for the metallic pens, these gel pens just aren’t that strongly opaque and don’t tend to show up that well on dark cardstock.

Swatches

Sketch Pen Results

Check out the video below to see the swatching and testing process:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Sprinkled With Love Sketch Phrase

Snowflakes Sketch Files

Smart Color Art 160 Colors Gel Pens (unfortunately, these went out of stock right after I made the video, so I’ve linked two similar sets from Smart Color Art below)

Smart Color Art 140 Colors Gel Pens

Smart Color Art 320 Colors Gel Pens

Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool

Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition (optional)

Chomas Creations Adjustable Marker Holder for Silhouette

Bazzill Smoothie Cardstock, Coconut Swirl

Bazzill Cardstock, Licorice Twist

 

Testing Cheap Gel Pens as Sketch Pens for Silhouette Cameo #silhouttecameo

How to Make Kiss Cut Sticker Sheets with Silhouette Cameo (Video)

How to Make Kiss Cut Sticker Sheets with Silhouette Cameo (Video) #printandcut #silhouettecameo

Stickers are one of my absolute favorite things to make with my die cutting machine, and in this Silhouette print & cut tutorial, I’ll show you how I make kiss cut sticker sheets with a Silhouette Cameo.

Kiss cutting just means that the machine makes a cut through only the sticker sheet and not the whole way through the sticker sheet backer paper. We cut the rectangle sticker sheets separately, and those ARE cut the whole way through, so you end up with professional looking sticker sheets with individual stickers that you can peel from the sheets.

In the video, I also share step-by-step tutorials for making cut files for high resolution PNG images both with and without margins, plus I show you how to use tracefiles to create cut lines for images.

Cut Settings : In the video, I used the default cut settings for the Silhouette Brand White Sticker Paper (Blade Depth : 2 // Speed : 8 // Force : 14 // Single Pass), but the Online Labels sticker paper that I use is a little bit thinner than the Silhouette brand. If my blade is on the dull side (like now), I use a blade depth of 2, but if I have a new blade I’ll bump that down to 1. To cut the rectangle sticker sheet the whole way through, I typically set my ratchet blade to a blade depth of 6 or 7, and sometimes I have to do multiple passes to cut cleanly through.

Check out the video below for a step-by-step tutorial on how to make kiss cut sticker sheets with Silhouette die cutting machines:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Fun in the Sun Elements / Stickers

Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool

Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition

Online Labels Full Sheet Standard White Matte Sticker Paper

Canon iX6520 Inkjet Printer

How to Make Kiss Cut Sticker Sheets with Silhouette Cameo (Video) #printandcut #silhouettecameo

Acrylic Pour Painting for Beginners : Testing DecoArt Pouring Medium

Acrylic Pour Painting for Beginners : Testing DecoArt Pouring Medium (Video) #pourpainting #acrylicpouring

In today’s video, I’m testing out the DecoArt Pouring Medium. This medium is a little bit more expensive than Floetrol and pricier than the DIY glue and water pouring medium that I’ve been using, but it already has an additive in there for creating cells, so that’s a bonus.

This medium was thinner than the other mediums that I’ve worked with so far. I used a 1:1 ratio of craft acrylics to pouring medium, and this was the recommended ratio on the jar of pouring medium. If you like your paint/medium mix to be on the thicker side, you could probably get away with a 60/40 mix.

Acrylic Pour Painting DecoArt Pouring Medium #pourpainting #acrylicpouring

Overall, I like this medium so far. It doesn’t create huge cells, but it definitely does create cells. I didn’t add heat to them, so I don’t know how their size would’ve increased had I done so. When the paintings dried, I did notice that the colors tended to be more muted and less saturated than they tend to be with Floetrol or the DIY glue and water pouring mediums, but it could just be the colors that I used in these paintings. I’ll have to do more testing to see if this is typical.

Check out the video below to learn how to see how DecoArt Pouring medium performs for acrylic pouring:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Husky Plastic Sheeting (or a large garbage bag / old newspapers / a bunch of plastic grocery bags / a painter’s dropcloth)

Foil Cookie Tray (to catch most of the excess paint as it runs off the edges of the painting – I purchased a set of 2 for $1.00 at the dollar store)

Vinyl / Nitrile Gloves (if you don’t want to be cleaning acrylic paint from under your fingernails for days, then use gloves – I buy mine by the box at Walmart in the cleaning supplies aisle)

Acrylic Craft Paints (in the video, I used DecoArt Crafters Acrylic White, Martha Stewart Cloud, a mix of DecoArt Americana Light Avocado + DecoArt Americana Saffron Yellow (for the olive green color), and a mix of Folk Art Aqua + Craft Smart Campground + Delta Ceramcoat Black (for the dark aqua color) craft acrylic paints)

DecoArt Pouring Medium (I used a ratio of 1:1 pouring medium to paint as recommended for craft acrylics)

Plastic Cups (to hold the paint / pouring medium mixture – you can use any small plastic cups for this, or you can save yogurt containers or even plastic cat food containers and use those)

Wood Craft Sticks (to stir the paint / pouring medium mixture – I picked up a package of 100 for $1.00 at the dollar store, and once the paint is completely dry on them, you can reuse them)

Art Alternatives 8×10 Canvas Panels

Plastic Shot Glasses (to raise the canvas off of the work surface so the paint can flow off the edges after you pour – I bought a package of 24 plastic shot glasses for $1.00 at the dollar store, but you can use food service containers, plastic yogurt containers, cat food containers, or even a small box under the canvas)

Acrylic Pouring for Beginners : Floetrol and Silicone Oil

Acrylic Pouring for Beginners : Floetrol and Silicone Oile #acrylicpouring #paintpouring #floetrol

Finally, Floetrol! Floetrol is one of the most popular pouring mediums for acrylic pouring, and in today’s acrylic pouring for beginners video I’ll show you how my very first Floetrol pour went. I also used silicone oil, which created lots of little cells throughout my paintings.

I had enough paint / pouring medium mixed for two paintings. The first painting didn’t turn out quite how I wanted, but as it dried I really liked the texture that the cells created throughout the painting, and I loved the darker areas of color along either side of the whiter center area. The second painting had larger areas of the blue colors, which I loved, and I also created an area of negative space on the top left of the painting with white paint. I like the sharp cutoff between the solid area of white and the blues. It creates great contrast and makes the colors stand out even more.

Acrylic Pouring Floetrol and Silicone #pourpainting #acrylicpouring #floetrol

Check out the video below to learn how to do paint pouring with Floetrol as a pouring medium:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Husky Plastic Sheeting (or a large garbage bag / old newspapers / a bunch of plastic grocery bags / a painter’s dropcloth)

Foil Cookie Tray (to catch most of the excess paint as it runs off the edges of the painting – I purchased a set of 2 for $1.00 at the dollar store)

Vinyl / Nitrile Gloves (if you don’t want to be cleaning acrylic paint from under your fingernails for days, then use gloves – I buy mine by the box at Walmart in the cleaning supplies aisle)

Acrylic Craft Paints (in the video, I used DecoArt Crafters Acrylic White, Martha Stewart Summer Haze, Folk Art Aqua, and a mix of Americana Ultramarine Blue and Midnight blue craft paints)

Floetrol (I used a ratio of 1:1 Floetrol to paint, but if you have a thicker paint, you might want to go to 60/40 Floetrol to paint or add a little bit of water to thin things out to a good consistency)

Plastic Cups (to hold the paint / pouring medium mixture – you can use any small plastic cups for this, or you can save yogurt containers or even plastic cat food containers and use those)

Wood Craft Sticks (to stir the paint / pouring medium mixture – I picked up a package of 100 for $1.00 at the dollar store, and once the paint is completely dry on them, you can reuse them)

Art Alternatives 8×10 Canvas Panels

Plastic Shot Glasses (to raise the canvas off of the work surface so the paint can flow off the edges after you pour – I bought a package of 24 plastic shot glasses for $1.00 at the dollar store, but you can use food service containers, plastic yogurt containers, cat food containers, or even a small box under the canvas)

Spot On 100% Silicone Treadmill Belt Lubricant to create cells in acrylic pour paintings. I used about 20 drops / 1/8 teaspoon to about 3 Tablespoons of the Floetrol/paint mixture.

Scalloped Heart Box SVG File Assembly Tutorial (Video)

Scalloped Heart Box SVG Cut File Assembly Tutorial #svgfiles #cutfiles #silhouettecameo #cricut

This sweet scalloped heart box is just the thing for all sorts of Valentine’s Day goodies and treats! Learn how to assemble the cut files in the step-by-step tutorial video below.

This file scales really well, and in the photo above, the pink box is scaled to 75% the original size, so if you’re looking for a smaller box for your Valentine’s Day goodies and treats, you can easily resize the box to the size that you’d like.

Check out the step-by-step tutorial below to learn how to assemble the scalloped heart box SVG files:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Scalloped Heart Box SVG Cut Files
Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool
Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition
Bazzill Smoothie Cardstock, Coconut Swirl (for the patterned liner pieces)
Love Always Digital Patterns (I used the multi-colored heart pattern from this set for the patterned liner pieces)
My Favorite Things Red Hot Card Stock
HP Premium Laserjet Paper, 32lb. (for the ribbon pieces on both boxes)
My Favorite Things Pink Lemonade Card Stock (for the pink box – MFT doesn’t seem to carry this color anymore, but their Tickled Pink card stock looks similar, so this is what I linked to)
Core’dinations Glitter Silk Cardstock (for the glitter piece on the pink box)
Scor-Tape, 1/4 inch
Nuvo Deluxe Adhesive
– craft scissors (optional, to cut the tape)

Scalloped Heart Box SVG Cut File Assembly Tutorial #svgfiles #cutfiles #silhouettecameo #cricut

My New Favorite Ink Blending Tool for Cardmaking (Video)

My New Favorite Ink Blending Tool for Cardmaking (Video)

If you’ve struggled with getting nice, smooth ink blending results for your cardmaking projects, then you’re definitely not alone. I’ve never been able to get great results with the popular tools on the market and have been looking for something that would work for me for a while. Part of my problem, I’m sure, is my own. I’m not terribly patient and have had a hard time getting the light, even hand that’s needed to get those great results with the popular ink blending tools. However, I’ve found something that’s been working really great for me, and that something is … makeup blending sponges!

The makeup sponges that I’ve been using are the dense foam, teardrop-shaped sponges that are typically used to apply foundation to the face, and I’m loving the ink blending results that I’m getting with them. Because the sponges don’t have any hard edges, they’re more forgiving, which makes it easier to get smooth ink blending results. Also, the larger sponges have great coverage for larger areas like ink blended card backgrounds. But, if you tend to use ink blending techniques in smaller areas, smaller sponges are also available.

I don’t have a different sponge for every ink or ink color that I use. I just have different ones for the main colors that I use, and sponges for light, medium, and dark tones of colors that I use most often. I’ve been storing them in a plastic box with dividers (I think it was meant for jewelry supplies and things like that), and I label each divided area with a card that has a color that represents what’s on the sponge. If you want a peek at that, I share it in the video.

Check out the video below to see examples of the great results that I’ve been getting:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

BEAKEY 5 Pcs Makeup Sponge Set Blender Beauty Foundation Blending Sponge
Strathmore 300 Series Bristol Smooth Pad, 9×12 Sheets
American Crafts Heidi Swapp Minc Non Stick Mat (a piece of scrap paper would work here, too)
Ranger Distress Oxide, Peacock Feathers
Ranger Distress Oxide, Faded Jeans
Ranger Distress Ink Mini, Dried Marigold
Ranger Distress Ink Mini, Picked Raspberry
Ranger Distress Ink Mini, Abandoned Coral
Rekukos Plastic Jewelry Box Organizer
– paper towels (for blending off ink between colors, if needed)

For the Finished Card

Botanical Heart Card – A2 & A7 Cut Files (I used the standalone A2 card front cut file)
– a piece of scrap paper (for the sentiment)
Ek Tools Powder Tool
Versamark Ink
Pretty Pink Posh Love Sentiments Stamp Set
WOW! Opaque Bright White Embossing Powder
Darice Embossing Multi-Purpose Heat Tool
Nuvo Deluxe Adhesive
Scotch Foam Mounting Tape
– white cardstock for the card base
– a stamp block

My New Favorite Ink Blending Tool for Cardmaking (Video)

Silhouette Print & Cut Troubleshooting and Tips (Video)

Silhouette Print & Cut Troubleshooting and Tips (Video) #printandcut #silhouettecameo #silhouetteportrait

In this final (planned) video in the Silhouette Print & Cut tutorial series, I’ll walk you through the process of printing and cutting step-by-step. Along the way, I’ll share some tips and pointers that will help you avoid some of the common issues that can cause problems with print & cut, and at the end of the video I’ll cover some more advanced troubleshooting tips.

Check out the video below for a step-by-step walkthrough for print & cut on the Silhouette digital die cutting machine:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool

Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition

Neenah Solar White 80lb. Cardstock

Silhouette Printable Clear Sticker Paper

Brother HLL8360CDW Color Laser Printer

Also Mentioned in the Video

Calibrating the Silhouette for Proper Print & Cut Registration Alignment

How to Make a Print & Cut Image from a Regular Cut File in Silhouette Studio (Video)

 

How to Make Print & Cut Files from Regular Cut Files in Silhouette Studio #silhouettecameo #svgfiles #printandcut

Have you ever wanted to know how to make a print & cut image from a regular cut file? In this video, I’ll show you how!

I’ve touched on this a little bit in a couple of the earlier videos in my Silhouette Print & Cut tutorial series, but in today’s video I’ll be using a more complex file that actually needs to be reassembled, and I think that these are often just the types of cut files that we’re looking to turn into images for print and cut. We’ll even personalize our print & cut gift tags to make them our own!

Tip : The Align options in the Transform panel in Silhouette Studio are super helpful for files that you need to reassamble because you can line the pieces up perfectly for printing and cutting.

Check out the video below for a step-by-step tutorial about coloring and reassembling regular cut files to make print & cut images:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Little Houses Snow Globe Cut Files
Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool
Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition
Neenah Solar White 80lb. cardstock
Canon Pixma iX6520 Printer

How to Make Print & Cut Files from Regular Cut Files in Silhouette Studio (Video) #silhouettecameo #svgfiles #printandcut

How to Make Custom Color Palettes for Print & Cut in Silhouette Studio (Video)

How to Make Custom Color Palettes for Print & Cut in Silhouette Studio (Video) #silhouettestudio #printandcut

If you’re ready to go beyond using the default color options and color picker tool to choose custom colors for your print & cut projects in Silhouette Studio, then this video in my Silhouette Print & Cut tutorial series is the one for you! I’ll show you how to find color inspiration and create your own, custom color palettes for print & cut in Silhouette Studio using several different resources that are available to you on the web for FREE.

In the video, I’ll also show you how to make a custom color chart using the free printable color chart that you can download in my post about getting better color print results for print and cut.

Check out the video to learn how to make custom color palettes for print & cut projects:

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

FREE Printable Silhouette Studio Color Chart
Neenah Solar White 80lb. cardstock
Canon Pixma iX6520 Printer

Websites Referenced in the Video

Color-Hex
Canva Color Palette Generator
My Pinterest Color Inspiration Board
Web Color Tools
HTML Colors from Image

Folk Art Village Cut File Assembly Instructions

Folk Art Village Cut File Assembly Instructions

These folk art-inspired village houses have been bumping around in my head for quite a while, and I’m so happy with how they turned out! In the video below, I’ll show you a step-by-step assembly tutorial for House 1, but all of the houses in the collection are assembled in the same way, so once you’ve put one together, you’ll know how to put them all together.

Each house only took me about 15-20 minutes to assemble, so it was about an hour and a half to put all five together.

Tip : If you notice that your cardstock or vellum is warping after you add liquid glue, you can place the piece or pieces under something heavy like a coffee table book or two until they’re completely dry. This way, they’ll dry flat.

Original Dimensions for all of the File Pieces

House 1

House Front : 6.2958 in. W x 7.6083 in. H
House Back : 6.2958 in. W x 7.3083 in. H
Roof Layer (optional) : 3 in. W x 5.6324 in. H
Window Piece 1 : 2.8518 in. W x 6.6945 in. H
Window Piece 2 (Cut 2) : 2.8 in. W x 3.2861 in. H

House 2

House Front : 8.3028 in. W x 7.3039 in. H
House Back : 8.3028 in. W x 7 in. H
Roof Layer (optional) : 4 in. W x 5.0056 in. H
Window Piece 1 : 3.8426 in. W x 5.7963 in. H
Window Piece 2 (Cut 2) : 3.85 in. W x 3.35 in. H

House 3

House Front : 6.3028 in. W x 5.8028 in. H
House Back : 6.3028 in. W x 5.5 in. H
Roof Layer (optional) : 3 in. W x 5 in. H
Window Piece 1 : 2.8611 in. W x 4.8611 in. H
Window Piece 2 (Cut 2) : 2.25 in. W x 2.25 in. H
Roof Window Piece : 1.3611 in. W x 1.2824 in. H

House 4

House Front : 8.3 in. W x 7.2194 in. H
House Back : 8.3 in. W x 6.9203 in. H
Roof Layer (optional) : 4 in. W x 9.848 in. H
Window Piece 1 : 3.8403 in. W x 6.1806 in. H
Window Piece 2 (Cut 2) : 3.75 in. W x 1.5 in. H
Roof Window Piece : 3.75 in. W x 1.125 in. H

House 5

House Front : 9.3 in. W x 5.9972 in. H
House Back : 9.3 in. W x 5.6992 in. H
Roof Layer (optional) : 4.5 in. W x 5.408 in. H
Window Piece 1 : 4.2917 in. W x 4.2986 in. H
Window Piece 2 (Cut 2) : 4.25 in. W x 2.25 in. H
Roof Window Piece : 1.25 in. W x 1.4444 in. H

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

Folk Art Village : House 1 Cut Files
Folk Art Village : House 2 Cut Files
Folk Art Village : House 3 Cut Files
Folk Art Village : House 4 Cut Files
Folk Art Village : House 5 Cut Files
Silhouette Cameo 3 Electronic Cutting Tool
Silhouette Studio, Designer Edition
Bazzill Smoothie Cardstock, Coconut Swirl
My Favorite Things Red Hot Card Stock
Bazzill Basics 8 1/2″ x 11″ Vellum Sheets, 40lb.
Scor-Tape, 1/4 inch (for all of the house tabs)
Scor-Tape, 5/8 inch (for the roof layers)
Nuvo Deluxe Adhesive
– craft scissors (optional, to cut the tape)

Tips for Better Print Results for Silhouette Print & Cut – FREE Printable Color Chart (Video)

Tips for Better Print Results Silhouette Print & Cut (FREE Printable Silhouette Studio Color Chart) #silhouettecameo #printandcut
In this video in my Silhouette Print & Cut tutorial series, I’ll share some tips for getting better print results when printing from Silhouette Studio.

First up, I talk a little bit about the two major color modes that you’ll encounter when working with any design software, and those modes are RGB (Red / Green / Blue) and CMYK (Cyan / Magenta / Yellow / Key (Black)).

RGB & CMYK Color Modes

The RGB color system is based on light. It’s called an “additive” system because the different colors are created by adding and mixing different variations of red, green, and blue light together. The more light that you add, the lighter the color will be. So, you can see in the image above (left), in the center area where all of the colors overlap at their highest intensity, the color that you get is white. Because RGB colors are communicated via light, the RGB color mode includes many super bright and vivid colors that you cannot get with the CMYK color mode, so the RGB spectrum offers a larger range of colors overall.

The CMYK color system is what is called a “subtractive” system and is based on pigments and how they’re either absorbed into or reflected off of a surface. Another name for it could be an “absorbative” system. You can see on the image above (right), in the center area where all of the colors overlap at their highest intensity, the color that you get is black. This is because black absorbs all color, so you can throw the max amounts of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black in there, and black will absorb them all. Different colors in this system are created by subtracting and mixing different variations of the four pigments, so the more pigment you subtract, the lighter the color or tone will be (in other words, lighter colors absorb less and reflect more), and when you subtract the max amount of all of the four pigments, you end up with the color white, which reflects all color and doesn’t absorb any.

Because printed surfaces like paper and fabric don’t emit light, colors in the CMYK system don’t tend to be as bright or vivid as colors on the screen, and the overall color range is more limited than the RGB system is.

In Silhouette Studio, you don’t have the ability to switch between color modes like you do in design software like Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator, but you can import clipart and images in either of the color modes and work with them in Studio.

Since Silhouette Studio offers less color management options than other design software, if you’re getting less than stellar print results when printing for print & cut projects, you can use some other tricks to adjust your image for better color results.

Your printers preference and options window will pop up when you click to print, and making changes to certain settings in this area that can make a big difference in your print results. Different brands of printers offer different print preferences and options, so what you see in your printer dialog window will be different than what I see in mine, unless we have the same printer. For my inkjet printer, which is a Canon Pixma iX6520, one option that makes a noticeable difference in my results is the Print Quality option. When I set it to High (vs. Standard), my colors are richer and more saturated. So, if you’re experiencing prints that are on the light site or a little bit washed out, try setting your printer to the highest quality print setting.

You may also have options for adjusting color tints, contrast, and intensity. Unless you’re noticing that your printer is consistently printing colors with, say, a green tint, or colors aren’t as intense or rich as you’d like on a regular basis, I would recommending making adjustments to individual images in your design software instead of changing settings within your printer because doing something like adjusting a color tint and leaving your printer set that way could actually cause images that would otherwise print fine to have color casts. But settings like contrast and intensity are definitely an option if you’re noticing that your images are too light or washed out in all of your print results.

Another good idea is to make test prints. I have a FREE printable .studio3 file with a color chart for the default Fill Panel options in Silhouette Studio that you can download below and use for your own test prints. I’ve included fill-in areas for paper / cardstock type and printer brand / model, too. I print this color chart on the brands of cardstock that I use most often so I can see how those default colors look when printed out.

In the video, I’ll also show you how to make subtle adjustments to images using the Image Effects Panel in Silhouette Studio, and these small adjustments can definitely make a big different in your printed results.

Check out the video below for tips on getting print results with Silhouette print & cut:

Supplies Used in This Project

The following supply list contains affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase through these links, and I really appreciate it if you do!

FREE Printable Silhouette Studio Color Chart
Hammermill Color Copy Digital Cover 80lb.
Neenah Solar White 80lb. cardstock
Brother HLL8360CDW Color Laser Printer
Canon Pixma iX6520 Printer
Cupcake Cuties Christmas Clip Art

Tips for Better Print Results Silhouette Print & Cut (FREE Printable Silhouette Studio Color Chart) #silhouettecameo #printandcut

The Yay List from k.becca

Join The Yay List for new product news, updates, and EXCLUSIVE, limited edition monthly freebies. Basically, you'll be the first to know what's happenin' around here. Yay to that!

You have successfully subscribed to The Yay List. Thank you!